Japan 'plans solar panels for all new buildings'

May 22, 2011
A technician inspects newly installed solar panels. Japan is considering a plan that would make it compulsory for all new buildings and houses to come fitted with solar panels by 2030, according to the Nikkei business daily.

Japan is considering a plan that would make it compulsory for all new buildings and houses to come fitted with solar panels by 2030, a business daily said Sunday.

The plan, expected to be unveiled at the upcoming G8 Summit in France, aims to show Japan's resolve to encourage technological innovation and promote the wider use of renewable energy, the Nikkei daily said.

Japan has reeled from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and the they triggered as it battles to stabilise the crippled Fukushima Daiichi atomic power plant.

On Thursday, the first day of the two-day summit in Deauville, France, Prime Minister Naoto Kan is expected to announce Japan's intention to continue operating after confirming their safety, the Nikkei said without citing sources.

But he is also expected to unveil a plan to step up efforts to push renewable energy and energy conservation.

Kan believes that the installation of solar panels would help Japan realise such goals, the Nikkei said.

He hopes that will drastically bring down costs of and thereby make the use of renewable energy more widespread, it said.

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User comments : 12

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antialias
3 / 5 (6) May 22, 2011
Good idea. It's a shame that people (and especially nations) need a serious catastrophe happening close to home before waking up and looking at alternatives.
Noumenal
3.8 / 5 (5) May 22, 2011
why not start now. They're rebuilding anyway at an already insane amount of money, why not just add a new industry to the costs and fit every rebuilt home with a solar panel. In 7-10 years they'll be making their money back, while rapidly advancing investment in the technology and becoming a world leader in solar panels. Win win all round.
Glyndwr
not rated yet May 22, 2011
they want to start this in 30 years....what a throw away political thing to say
mrlewish
4 / 5 (4) May 23, 2011
they want to start this in 30 years....what a throw away political thing to say


You don't do math very well.
rwinners
3.7 / 5 (3) May 23, 2011
I think this is admirable. I'd hope they start immediately where possible.
lurch
not rated yet May 23, 2011
Plenty of time for everyone to have forgotten about the current situation
CarolinaScotsman
3 / 5 (2) May 23, 2011
Sounds like an idea whose time has come now, not in twenty years and everywhere, not just Japan.
wwqq
not rated yet May 23, 2011
You don't do math very well.


You don't understand politics very well. Promises are cheap as long as someone else is in power when they have to act on them.
wwqq
5 / 5 (1) May 23, 2011
Sounds like an idea whose time has come now, not in twenty years and everywhere, not just Japan.


Renewables are crushingly expensive even when they don't have to deal with intermittency or seasonal variations.

In 2009 Germany had 8.9 GW of installed PV. This produces on average as much power as a single nuclear reactor or a single medium sized coal plant. Germany has committed itself to pay feed-in-tariffs over the next 20 years for these panels which adds up to 60-78 billion dollars.

Germany is planning 26 new coal plants. Why? Because they're phasing out nuclear reactors and they have no confidence whatever that renewables will be able to replace them. There are 60 000 coal particulate deaths in Germany every year; corresponding to a coal-chernobyl every 5 weeks.

tttt
5 / 5 (3) May 25, 2011
You don't do math very well.


You don't understand politics very well. Promises are cheap as long as someone else is in power when they have to act on them.


I think he is trying to say there are only 19 years till 2030. not 30.
Jmaximus
not rated yet May 28, 2011


In 2009 Germany had 8.9 GW of installed PV. This produces on average as much power as a single nuclear reactor or a single medium sized coal plant.


Sorry but that is equal to about 9 nuclear power plants, not 1.
HarshMistress
not rated yet May 29, 2011


In 2009 Germany had 8.9 GW of installed PV. This produces on average as much power as a single nuclear reactor or a single medium sized coal plant.


Sorry but that is equal to about 9 nuclear power plants, not 1.

Yes, installed PV power equates to nine nuclear reactors, but PV energy production is nine times lower. Meaning: 8.9 GW of PV power generates as much energy as 1 GW of nuclear power.

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