Research paper on magnetic control makes the top 10

Nov 30, 2010
Research paper on magnetic control makes the top 10
A study of the electric field control of magnetism was named one of the top 10 papers of the past decade by Advanced Functional Materials Photo by Lauren McFalls

A study of the electric field control of magnetism led by a Northeastern engineering professor was named one of the top 10 papers of the past decade by the prestigious journal Advanced Functional Materials.

Professor of electrical and computer engineering Nian Sun and his team reported on their effort to solve the need for greater in controlling magnetic properties, in applications such as motors; generators; disk drives; inductors; and transformers in cars, computers and cell phones.

The conventional approach has been through fields generated by electromagnets, which require large amounts of current, are bulky, and severely limit the applications of magnetic materials. Sun and his colleagues pursued a newer method known as electric field control, which is potentially more space and energy efficient.

As part of this research, Sun began investigating a new group of composite materials, known as multiferroic composites, five years ago. A strong, effective was produced by an electric field in a layered multiferroic composite, which used a negligible amount of energy. In sharp contrast, conventional electromagnets typically need hundreds of watts of power consumption to generate such a magnetic field, Sun said.

"The effective electric field control of magnetism in magnetic layered structures has significant technological implications," said Sun. "The compact and nearly passive electric magnetic control of magnetism could lead to more compact wireless communication systems and radar systems with significantly reduced and longer . It may also lead to new random access memory devices and other novel spintronic devices. The effective electric field control of magnetism may dramatically change our lifestyle."

Explore further: Chemists achieve new technique with profound implications for drug development

More information: Paper online: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10… m.200801907/abstract

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lengould100
not rated yet Nov 30, 2010
A strong, effective magnetic field was produced by an electric field in a layered multiferroic composite, which used a negligible amount of energy.


It would be good if the article confirmed that the laws of thermodynamics still hold, eg. a magnetic field rapidly oscillating in polarity still requires approximately the same amount of energy to oscillate. Otherwise people will start dreaming of 100 kw electric motors requiring only 10 kw of electricity to operate...
Simonsez
not rated yet Nov 30, 2010
F*cking magnets, how do they work?!
electrodynamic
not rated yet Jan 13, 2011
Sounds like a possible way of storing power.