Physicists discover new type of spin waves

Current technologies for information transfer and processing are challenged by fundamental physical limits. The more powerful they become, the more energy they need, and the more heat is released to the environment. Also, ...

Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air

"They eat and sleep while they are airborne. This is something that researchers have believed since the 1950s, and now we can show that it's true", says Anders Hedenström, professor at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

How Australia can be a carbon-neutral nation by 2050

Strong action on climate change is vital if Australia is to thrive in the future. Lack of consensus on climate policy over the past two decades has cost us dearly. It has harmed our natural environment, our international ...

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Efficient energy use

Efficient energy use, sometimes simply called energy efficiency, is using less energy to provide the same level of energy service. An example would be insulating a home to use less heating and cooling energy to achieve the same temperature. Another example would be installing fluorescent lights and/or skylights instead of incandescent lights to attain the same level of illumination. Efficient energy use is achieved primarily by means of a more efficient technology or process rather than by changes in individual behaviour.

Energy efficient buildings, industrial processes and transportation could reduce the world's energy needs in 2050 by one third, and help controlling global emissions of greenhouse gases, according to the International Energy Agency.

Energy efficiency and renewable energy are said to be the twin pillars of sustainable energy policy.

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