Related topics: magnetic field · electrons · materials · atoms · metal

Old methods prove true for studying proteins

A fresh new look at an old technique in protein biochemistry has shown that it should be reintroduced to the spectroscopy toolkit.

When Fock meets Landau: Topology in atom-photon interactions

Since the discovery of the quantum Hall effect, topological phases of electrons have become a major research area in condensed matter physics. Many topological phases are predicted in lattices with specific engineering of ...

The recipe for powerful quasar jets

Some supermassive black holes launch powerful beams of material, or jets, while others do not. Astronomers may now have identified why.

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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