Related topics: magnetic field · electrons · materials · atoms · metal

Limitation exposed in promising quantum computing material

Quantum computers promise to perform operations of great importance believed to be impossible for our technology today. Current computers process information via transistors carrying one of two units of information, either ...

Researchers develop computer model of ferrofluid motion

Ferrofluids, with their mesmeric display of shape-shifting spikes, are a favorite exhibit in science shows. These eye-catching examples of magnetic fields in action could become even more dramatic through computational work ...

Shape-encoded dynamic assembly of mobile micromachines

Field-directed and self-propelled colloidal assembly can be used to build micromachines to perform complex motions and functions, although their integration as heterogenous components with specified structures, dynamics and ...

New virtual laboratory for merging neutron stars

For the first time, a high-performance computer will make it possible to simulate gravitational waves, magnetic fields and neutrino physics of neutron stars simultaneously.

Alternating currents cause Jupiter's aurora

An international team of researchers has succeeded in measuring the current system responsible for Jupiter's aurora. Using data transmitted to Earth by NASA's Juno spacecraft, they showed that the direct currents were much ...

Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth

On Sep. 1, 1859, solar astronomer Richard Carrington witnessed sunspots that suddenly and briefly flashed brightly before they disappeared. Just before dawn the next day, auroras erupted over most of the Earth, reaching as ...

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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