Related topics: magnetic field · electrons · materials · atoms · metal

Antimatter from laser pincers

In the depths of space, there are celestial bodies where extreme conditions prevail: Rapidly rotating neutron stars generate super-strong magnetic fields. And black holes, with their enormous gravitational pull, can cause ...

Stimulating blood vessel formation with magnetic fields

Magnetic fields can be used to stimulate blood vessel growth, according to a study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The findings, by researchers at the Tecnico Lisboa and NOVA School ...

Unravelling the knotty problem of the sun's activity

A new approach to analyzing the development of magnetic tangles on the Sun has led to a breakthrough in a longstanding debate about how solar energy is injected into the solar atmosphere before being released into space, ...

The origin of bifurcated current sheets explained

A Korean research team has identified the origin of bifurcated current sheets, considered one of the most unsolved mysteries in the Earth's magnetosphere and in magnetized plasma physics.

Bacteria enlisted in French push for rare earths autonomy

As Europe seeks to reduce its reliance on China for the rare earth metals needed for modern batteries and electronics, French researchers have found a potentially potent ally: bacteria that can help extract the elements from ...

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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