Related topics: magnetic field · electrons · materials · atoms · metal

Using quantum properties of light to transmit information

Researchers at the University of Rochester and Cornell University have taken an important step toward developing a communications network that exchanges information across long distances by using photons, mass-less measures ...

Researchers create MRI-like technique for imaging magnetic waves

A team of researchers from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Leiden University, Tohoku University and the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter has developed a new type of MRI scanner that ...

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids

In 1973, physicist and later Nobel laureate Philip W. Anderson proposed a bizarre state of matter: the quantum spin liquid (QSL). Unlike the everyday liquids we know, the QSL actually has to do with magnetism—and magnetism ...

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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