Related topics: magnetic field · electrons · materials · atoms · metal

Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds

Using modern nanotechnology, it is possible nowadays to produce structures which have a feature sizes of just a few nanometres. This world of the most minute particles—also known as quantum systems—makes possible a wide ...

Q&A: Toward the next generation of computing devices

Ever noticed how our smartphones and computing devices become faster within short spans? You can thank Moore's law for that. Back in 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the processing power of computers would ...

Faster magnetic switch with lower energy consumption developed

Magnetic materials are ubiquitous in modern society, present in nearly all the technological devices we use every day. In particular, personal electronics like smartphones/watches, tablets, and desktop computers all rely ...

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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