Electric cars get charged wirelessly in London (w/ Video)

Nov 04, 2010 by John Messina report
Wireless charging system allows the next generation of electric vehicles to be charged wirelessly. Credit: HaloIPT

(PhysOrg.com) -- HaloIPT has recently demonstrated wireless charging of electric vehicles in London using their inductive power transfer technology. The company fitted Citroen electric cars with receiver pads on the underside of the car, allowing the batteries to be charged wirelessly.

Existing such as the Leaf and i-MiEV requires an electric cable to be connected from a socket on the side of the car to street-side power station or electrical socket at home.

The IPT technology uses inductive charging and the electrical pads in the road are buried under the asphalt making them invisible and protecting them from adverse weather conditions. HaloIPT claims that their charging system provides for greater lateral movement which means that the vehicle’s receiving pad does not have to be directly over the transmitter pad.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
IPT system allows the next generation of electric vehicles to be charged wirelessly and even powered up as they drive over electrified roads.

IPT System

The primary power supply is powered from the mains supply and energizes a lumped coil; the current ranges anywhere from 5 to125 amps. Since the coil is inductive, compensation may be required using series or parallel capacitors to reduce the working voltages and currents in the supply circuitry.

The receiver pad coils are magnetically coupled to the primary power coil. Power is transferred by tuning the receiver pad coil to the operating frequency of the primary pad coil with series or parallel capacitors. The power transfer is controllable with a switch-mode controller.

The IPT charging system gives drivers a ‘worry free’ solution about forgetting to recharge their electric vehicle. It also eliminates the need for a driver to make a conscious decision about having to charge their vehicle.

According to HaloIPT a commercial scale demo of their IPT technology is expected in 2012.

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More information: HaloIPT

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User comments : 17

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jwalkeriii
1 / 5 (2) Nov 04, 2010
Same idea and same video from 2009 as far as I can tell (youtube: HaloIPT). Isa warrantless repost.
DamienS
3.3 / 5 (3) Nov 04, 2010
Existing electric cars such as the Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi i-MiEV requires an electric cable to be connected from a socket on the side of the car to street-side power station or electrical socket at home.

The IPT technology uses inductive charging...

If electric vehicles are about energy efficiency, then surely cable charging is way more efficient. Sure, induction charging may be less of a hassle, but it does waste quite a bit of power in the process. It's interesting they don't mention the associated losses in the article.
fixer
5 / 5 (2) Nov 04, 2010
If they are really smart they will run existing overhead power supplies underground and charge from the inductance from the HV supply that is usually lost.
Added bonus, removal of international eyesores- telegraph posts!
trekgeek1
5 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2010
If they are really smart they will run existing overhead power supplies underground and charge from the inductance from the HV supply that is usually lost.
Added bonus, removal of international eyesores- telegraph posts!


If you design a system to extract power from magnetic fields, it will do more than just take the lost energy. Since it is depleting that magnetic field, the cable will try to replenish its field thus causing increased losses. So yeah, it could charge the car, but it will suck a lot of juice from the lines and that juice was heading somewhere with a purpose.
Saiful_Nizam
2 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2010
What about the EMF radiation? i think that's the main problem for this application to be implemented. My two cents..
tkjtkj
3 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2010
All of the above seems true, but: there really might be room for this technology:
I pro-rated ($/mile/lb.weight) my electric bicycle .. from its 60 lb up to the wgt of a 2500 lb car ..
and surprisingly, the numbers worked out to be a 'gasoline price equivalent' of $1.05 / gallon.
If these numbers are any where near accurate, the wasted energy losses of this system could still make for a relatively economically sound alternative.
but:
"One bicycle, even with an overweight rider,does not a valid computation make"
Planetbob99
4 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2010
A wireless solution *almost* makes sense for cell phones and the like - when the receiver is actually integrated into the item being charged, and the energy levels involved are small.
Wireless charging of something on the scale of a car:
- breaks any ability to participate in the 'smart' grid: your car would not be able to feed back into the grid (and if you care about green measures, being part of the storage of power is a BIG deal)
- Will use at least 20% more power that a physical connection would in order to get the same charge. At LEAST. Park a little bit off of optimal and it will be closer to 50% more, or even twice as power.
- A dedicated high school student could create a lego MindStorm project that would connect a physical cable to a particular type of electric car. It just is NOT that difficult. A couple of servos, a sensor or two and a few magnets.

tkjtkj
5 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2010
PlanetBob99 said:
- Will use at least 20% more power that a physical connection would in order to get the same charge. At LEAST. Park a little bit off of optimal and it will be closer to 50% more, or even twice as power.


so, as i suggested, that results still a significant saving over present technology.

My "$1 / gal" becomes "2", still 33% less than gasoline prices here in USA...
Jimbaloid
5 / 5 (2) Nov 05, 2010
It might however also solve some other 'social issues' that might yet be seen; When we reach a certain saturation of electric vehicles and charging points we might see mischievous types unplugging/cutting cables, or hijacking your charge while you are gone. Also perhaps removes a trip hazard?!
jsland
1 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2010
What does millions of vehicles demanding electrical "fuel" going to do to our grid?????
Buyck
5 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2010
Very usefull technology! Very practical and a clean solution in stead of cables and so on...
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Nov 06, 2010

My "$1 / gal" becomes "2", still 33% less than gasoline prices here in USA...


Have you factored in the increase in electricity prices due to increased demand?
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Nov 06, 2010
Also, if the system is, say 80% efficient, and you got 50 kWh to charge in 8 hours. That would mean you would output 12.5 kWh of stray energy, or the equivalent of using a 1.5 kW space heater for 8 hours.

For one thing, I don't want to be standing next to the device when it's dumping 1.5 kilowatts to its surroundings. That's like standing next to a pile of a thousand cellphones all transmitting at the same time.
Alburton
1 / 5 (2) Nov 07, 2010
Funny thing with the charger having sensors for stopping if the cat walks by.
WitH this things losses cats are just going to love that warm little cozy spot....
wont humankind stop until it is destroyed by the psycho-mutant-cat-army of its creation?
random
1 / 5 (1) Nov 08, 2010
Tesla woz 'ere
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Nov 08, 2010
For one thing, I don't want to be standing next to the device when it's dumping 1.5 kilowatts to its surroundings. That's like standing next to a pile of a thousand cellphones all transmitting at the same time.
That's more akin to standing in line at a rock concert. The human body produces a lot of juice on it's own.
fixer
not rated yet Nov 08, 2010
To get an idea of the losses from overhead power lines, stand under one and hold up a fluorescent light tube!
That power can be put to good use, it is already produced, it just needs harvesting.

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