Energy police patrolling China

Jun 13, 2007

China is recruiting "energy police" to make sure offices, schools, shopping malls and other buildings aren't using too much power.

Inspectors in Beijing and Yangzhou are checking to see that building owners are meeting national standards by keeping the air conditioning no cooler than 78 degrees Fahrenheit and heating no higher than 68 degrees Fahrenheit, China's official Xinhua news service said Tuesday.

The government said air conditioners account for 30-35 percent of power consumption in Yangzhou during the summer. Citizens are being urged to save energy by using public transportation or bicycles to get to work, and limiting the use of air conditioners at home.

China recently unveiled a plan to reduce energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product 20 percent by 2010, Xinhua said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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