Related topics: brain · nerve cells · brain cells · cells · protein

Bringing bad proteins back into the fold

A study led by UT Southwestern has identified a mechanism that controls the activity of proteins known as chaperones, which guide proteins to fold into the right shapes. The findings, published online today in Nature Communications, ...

Nanomedicine's 'crown' is ready for its close up

An international team of researchers led by Michigan State University's Morteza Mahmoudi has developed a new method to better understand how nanomedicines—emerging diagnostics and therapies that are very small yet very ...

Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells

The transport of amino acids and other molecules across the cell's membrane plays a crucial role in the metabolism of cells and, therefore, in human health. Current research hints that cancer, cystic fibrosis, aminoacidurias ...

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Neurodegenerative disease

Neurodegenerative disease (Greek νέυρο-, néuro-, "nerval" and Latin dēgenerāre, "to decline" or "to worsen") is a condition in which cells of the brain and spinal cord are lost. The brain and spinal cord are composed of neurons that do different functions such as controlling movements, processing sensory information, and making decisions. Cells of the brain and spinal cord are not readily regenerated en masse, so excessive damage can be devastating. Neurodegenerative diseases result from deterioration of neurons or their myelin sheath which over time will lead to dysfunction and disabilities resulting from this.

Some sources limit the term "degenerative" to conditions primarily affecting gray matter that are not associated with a obvious inciting event.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA