New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain

It's been estimated that the human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons, together completing countless tasks through countless connections. So how do we make sense of the roles each of these neurons play? As part of ...

Machine learning tracks moving cells

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists ...

Researchers develop increasingly complex mini-brains

Scientists of the D'Or Institute for Research and Education have improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. Their ...

How did reading and writing evolve? Neuroscience gives a clue

The part of the brain that processes visual information, the visual cortex, evolved over the course of millions of years in a world where reading and writing didn't exist. So it's long been a mystery how these skills could ...

Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments

A 3-D hydrogel created by researchers in U of T Engineering Professor Molly Shoichet's lab is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive ...

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Brain cell

Brain cell is a generic term for the neurons and glial cells. Neurons are nerve cells that process and transmit information through the nervous system. Glial cells provide support, protection, and nutrition to the neurons. Other cells in the brain include epithelial cells that make up the lining of the blood vessels.

Brain cells are commonly thought to remain in the beginning stage of interphase of cell reproduction for their life, and never divide, and instead develop by forming new synapses with other neurons. However, a landmark study in 1998 by researchers from Sweden and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, showed for the first time that some brain cells in mature humans may regenerate under certain circumstances.

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