Related topics: brain · nerve cells · brain cells · cells · stem cells

Shaping the social networks of neurons

The three proteins teneurin, latrophilin and FLRT hold together and bring neighboring neurons into close contact, enabling the formation of synapses and the exchange of information between the cells. In the early phase of ...

Researchers decode the circuitry of neuromuscular organoids

The Gouti lab from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) has developed functional neuromuscular organoids (NMOs) that self-organize into spinal cord neurons and muscle tissue. ...

'Census' in the zebrafish's brain

The zebrafish is a master of regeneration: If brain cells are lost due to injury or disease, it can simply reproduce them—contrary to humans, where this only happens in the fetal stage. However, the zebrafish is evolutionarily ...

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

In a circular arena, a fruit fly navigates a virtual landscape illuminated by black and blue lights. The fly is tethered in place, able to flap its wings but not move its head. Images on the wall rotate to give the illusion ...

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Neuron

A neuron (pronounced /ˈnjʊərɒn/ N(Y)OOR-on, also known as a neurone or nerve cell) is an excitable cell in the nervous system that processes and transmits information by electrochemical signalling. Neurons are the core components of the brain, the vertebrate spinal cord, the invertebrate ventral nerve cord, and the peripheral nerves. A number of specialized types of neurons exist: sensory neurons respond to touch, sound, light and numerous other stimuli affecting cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain. Motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord and cause muscle contractions and affect glands. Interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord. Neurons respond to stimuli, and communicate the presence of stimuli to the central nervous system, which processes that information and sends responses to other parts of the body for action. Neurons do not go through mitosis, and usually cannot be replaced after being destroyed, although astrocytes have been observed to turn into neurons as they are sometimes pluripotent.

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