Scientists invent way to trap mysterious 'dark world' particle at Large Hadron Collider

Scientists invent way to trap mysterious ‘dark world’ particle at Large Hadron Collider
A new paper outlines a method to directly detect particles from the 'dark world' using the Large Hadron Collider. Until now we've only been able to make indirect measurements and simulations, such as the visualization of dark matter above. Credit: Zarija Lukic/Berkeley Lab

Now that they've identified the Higgs boson, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have set their sights on an even more elusive target.

All around us is and —the invisible stuff that binds the galaxy together, but which no one has been able to directly detect. "We know for sure there's a dark world, and there's more energy in it than there is in ours," said LianTao Wang, a University of Chicago professor of physics who studies how to find signals in large particle accelerators like the LHC.

Wang, along with scientists from the University and UChicago-affiliated Fermilab, think they may be able to lead us to its tracks; in a paper published April 3 in Physical Review Letters, they laid out an innovative method for stalking dark matter in the LHC by exploiting a potential particle's slightly slower speed.

While the dark world makes up more than 95 percent of the universe, scientists only know it exists from its effects—like a poltergeist you can only see when it pushes something off a shelf. For example, we know there's dark matter because we can see gravity acting on it—it helps keep our galaxies from flying apart.

Theorists think there's one particular kind of dark particle that only occasionally interacts with normal matter. It would be heavier and longer-lived than other known particles, with a lifetime up to one tenth of a second. A few times in a decade, researchers believe, this particle can get caught up in the collisions of protons that the LHC is constantly creating and measuring.

"One particularly interesting possibility is that these long-lived dark particles are coupled to the Higgs boson in some fashion—that the Higgs is actually a portal to the dark world," said Wang, referring to the last holdout particle in physicists' grand theory of how the universe works, discovered at the LHC in 2012. "It's possible that the Higgs could actually decay into these long-lived particles."

The only problem is sorting out these events from the rest; there are more than a billion collisions per second in the 27-kilometer LHC, and each one of these sends subatomic chaff spraying in all directions.

Wang, UChicago postdoctoral fellow Jia Liu and Fermilab scientist Zhen Liu (now at the University of Maryland) proposed a new way to search by exploiting one particular aspect of such a dark particle. "If it's that heavy, it costs energy to produce, so its momentum would not be large—it would move more slowly than the speed of light," said Liu, the first author on the study.

That time delay would set it apart from all the rest of the normal particles. Scientists would only need to tweak the system to look for particles that are produced and then decay a bit more slowly than everything else.

The difference is on the order of a nanosecond—a billionth of a second—or smaller. But the LHC already has detectors sophisticated enough to catch this difference; a recent study using data collected from the last run and found the method should work, plus the detectors will get even more sensitive as part of the upgrade that is currently underway.

"We anticipate this method will increase our sensitivity to long-lived dark by more than an order of magnitude—while using capabilities we already have at the LHC," Liu said.

Experimentalists are already working to build the trap: When the LHC turns back on in 2021, after boosting its luminosity by tenfold, all three of the major detectors will be implementing the new system, the scientists said. "We think it has great potential for discovery," Liu said.

"If the particle is there, we just have to find a way to dig it out," Wang said. "Usually, the key is finding the question to ask."


Explore further

CERN lab on the hunt for dark matter

More information: Jia Liu et al. Enhancing Long-Lived Particles Searches at the LHC with Precision Timing Information, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.131801
Journal information: Physical Review Letters

Citation: Scientists invent way to trap mysterious 'dark world' particle at Large Hadron Collider (2019, April 18) retrieved 23 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-scientists-mysterious-dark-world-particle.html
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Apr 18, 2019
Now there's a "Dark World"! That's hilarious.

Apr 18, 2019
Yes Jax, you are correct.
Had to happen some time.
The Dark World is hilarious!

A hilarious joke on all the looneyticks who believe that their loud infantile tantrums dictate Reality.

Apr 18, 2019
Notice how quick they took this article down off the front page? That's hilarious too!

Talk about jumping the shark.

Apr 18, 2019
Since "natural" WIMPS are all but excluded (LHC, ACME), and axions look disfavored (matter/antimatter symmetry breaking CP conditions looks preliminary fulfilled by the neutrino sector), there are some less fun alternatives for theorists and experimentalists.

Either an unnatural WIMP or more likely a just-gravity interacting sector, which is consistent with the anthropic universe that comes out of Planck (thus far); no joy for theorists since the theory is unhelpful and no joy for experimentalists in the latter case since the interactions are unhelpful.

Or something contrived (and hence less likely as well), which AFAIK is what this suggestion and many similar ones comes out as. But at least something like this would make theorists and experimentalists happy - it is complex and it is somewhat easily observable - so by all means let us test these options as well! Just that ... they are so unexciting options right now.

Apr 18, 2019
Hmmm the scientists at University of Chicago are equating this 'dark world' with poltergeists that push things off a table (according to the article).
However way/method these scientists manage to do it, it appears that they won't be satisfied and their curiosity sated until they are able to find the way to 'disassemble' the Universe, both macro and quantum, so that our Universe will pop out of existence. That seems to be what they are working toward - to find that elusive particle that holds ALL Matter/Energy together. When they accomplish their task and somehow remove the "glue" and the "binding agent" - everyone can kiss their arse goodbye. All Matter/Energy in this Universe is under siege by this curious bunch who know not what they do, are doing, or what their final results will be. They wish to play "God", rather than just attempt to improve things for the human race.
Science will be the DEATH of the human race if these scientists continue on their merry way to destruction

Apr 18, 2019
The Darkists are attempting to spread their darkness into every nook and cranny of the Universe

Apr 18, 2019
@Tobjorn

One thing we know for certain about the universe is its elegance. When possibilities start becoming so "unexciting" "less fun" "unhelpful" and "no joy" it's best to broaden the range of inquiry and revisit underlying theories.

Apr 18, 2019
From the article:
...we know there's dark matter because we can see gravity acting on it—...
Since the DM is 'dark' and we can't 'see' how it may be affected by visible matter's gravity, then I suspect the author meant to say that it's the DM's gravity that acts on the visible stars and hence their overall orbital speeds/distribution....not the other way round. :)

Apr 18, 2019
The Darkists are attempting to spread their darkness into every nook and cranny of the Universe


From a clown who understands the square root of zero about any relevant science.

Apr 18, 2019
Jax. "Art is in the eye of the beholder."
You claim this Universe is "Elegant"
I would claim this Universe a wretched mess at this early period of existence.
Maybe over hundreds of billions of years, it might improve?
But such a tedious boor until this Cosmos matures!

Apr 18, 2019
it's best to broaden the range of inquiry and revisit underlying theories.
We revisit a theory when something contradicts it. Do you have some scientific paper in a prestigious journal to cite? Or is this just more of your bullshit?

Apr 18, 2019
Since "natural" WIMPS are all but excluded (LHC, ACME), and axions look disfavored (matter/antimatter symmetry breaking CP conditions looks preliminary fulfilled by the neutrino sector), there are some less fun alternatives for theorists and experimentalists.

Either an unnatural WIMP or more likely a just-gravity interacting sector, which is consistent with the anthropic universe that comes out of Planck (thus far);

This is where I've been for a while... Gravity interacting with other gravity...


Apr 19, 2019
Dude's on some bullshit for assuming dark matter is even a thing. Electromagnetic radiation (light) has weight, otherwise it couldn't have force according to f=ma. He should try unifying Einsteinian physics and quantum physics rather than make shit up.

Apr 19, 2019
Dark matter is a supersolid that fills 'empty' space, strongly interacts with ordinary matter and is displaced by ordinary matter. What is referred to geometrically as curved spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter. The state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter is gravity.

The supersolid dark matter displaced by a galaxy pushes back, causing the stars in the outer arms of the galaxy to orbit the galactic center at the rate in which they do.

Displaced supersolid dark matter is curved spacetime.

In the Bullet Cluster collision the dark matter has not separated from the ordinary matter. The collision is analogous to two boats that collide, the boats slow down and their bow waves continue to propagate. The water has not separated from the boats, the bow waves have. In the Bullet Cluster collision the galaxy's associated dark matter displacement waves have separated from the colliding galaxies, causing the light to lense

Apr 19, 2019
Dude's on some bullshit for assuming dark matter is even a thing. Electromagnetic radiation (light) has weight, otherwise it couldn't have force according to f=ma. He should try unifying Einsteinian physics and quantum physics rather than make shit up.


And another asshole shows up.

Apr 19, 2019
Electromagnetic radiation (light) has weight, otherwise it couldn't have force according to f=ma
Hey, peanut-brain - photons have momentum. Guess you didn't learn that in genius class, huh?

Try this: https://courses.l...omentum/

He should try unifying Einsteinian physics and quantum physics rather than make shit up
Try unifying your brain with 8th-grade physics before trying the heavy lifting. Just sayin'...

Apr 19, 2019
Photons don't exist in physical reality. Attempts to quantify a field use fictional particles in order to have something countable. Math needs numbers. It is impossible to say how big a square is without making up a unit of measure...like inches or meters. Then you can do math and find the area of a square with formulas.

Apr 19, 2019
Sorry, not real interested in what Mr. Kitchen Patrol has to say.


Apr 22, 2019
Dark energy and Dark matter are mirages
https://arxiv.org...004.4496


Obviously not, both are observed by many independent means (though this article fails to describe that).

The paper you refer to, as well as its author, is problematic. It is solely arxiv published, and while Gunn Quznetsov (aka "gunnqu", at a guess) has been on journal published papers his current location is "Management" in an obscure Russian university. And it discuss a fringe "probabilistic gravity" theory, so has nothing to say on modern cosmological general relativistic phenomena. And "gunnqu" repeatedly trolls own work!

Not something others likely will read.

Apr 22, 2019
Dude's on some bullshit for assuming dark matter is even a thing. Electromagnetic radiation (light) has weight, otherwise it couldn't have force according to f=ma. He should try unifying Einsteinian physics and quantum physics rather than make shit up.


Dark matter is consensus, so if someone is "on" something it may be those who do not know or do not care about modern physics.

And why would quantum gravity help? You do not have references suggesting why. As a matter of fact, what you ask for is done, the last two decades have seen people work out and somewhat test a mundane gravity quantum particle field theory [ http://www.schola...d_theory ]. Asone would expect if that works out, nothing new is learned on modern cosmological models, dark matter and dark energy is unaffected.

- tbctd -

Apr 22, 2019
- ctd-

What we do learn, especially since the M87* papers suggest a general relativity mechanism ergosphere mechanism driving black hole jets, is that quantum field theory suffice all the way up to the event horizon where physics currently breaks down (or at least becomes fraught with difficulties).

Since the 2018 Planck data release could pin inflation to "slow roll", and that is most likely a single quantum particle field, we can surmise that cosmology today is happy with general relativity and quantum particle field theory - and so dark matter and dark energy - on large scales.

Apr 22, 2019
Sorry, not real interested in what Mr. Kitchen Patrol has to say.


I blocked him (and the other two that trolled) since the comment starts with erroneous claims without even trying to find a reference, and since it tries to make the tail of math wag the dog of physics.

Quantum field theory is not accepted as axiomatic math AFAIK, but physicists know it works for prediction including when it breaks down based on physics algorithms. More like algebraic computer science than axiomatic math, in other words, not surprisingly since CS has to account for physical resources such as execution time and memory space.

So who is failing here, physicists that can do physics or mathematicians who cannot? Math is a tool, physics is a better tool, precisely as one could expect.

Apr 24, 2019
"I hold that space cannot be curved, for the simple reason that it can have no properties." -Nikola Tesla

Apr 24, 2019
There is no such thing as a wave without a medium. Photons are fictional. In any wave, the medium is real. A wave is what happens to the medium...what the medium is doing.

Apr 25, 2019
hey wang , ive already dug it out on my tabletop in 2010. watch
https://www.youtu...g68VE-Ys
btw higgs boson does not exist

Apr 25, 2019
btw higgs boson does not exist


*Snort.*Yeah, its discovery only netted the scientists involved the 2013 years Nobel Prize in physics [ https://en.wikipe...gs_boson ]

Blocked for inane trolling.

Apr 25, 2019
The Higgs boson was detected by the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2012 by two different detectors.

https://science.s...6091/141

That was seven years ago. Wake up and smell the coffee.

Apr 25, 2019
The Higgs boson was detected by the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2012 by two different detectors.

https://science.s...6091/141

That was seven years ago. Wake up and smell the coffee.
so you believed that shit?

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