Physical Review Letters (PRL), established in 1958, is a peer reviewed, scientific journal that is published 52 times per year by the American Physical Society. According to various measurement standards, which includes the Journal Citation Reports impact factor, Physical Review Letters is considered to be a prestigious journal in the field of physics. PRL is published as a print journal, and is in electronic format, online and CD-ROM. Its focus is rapid dissemination of significant, or notable, results of fundamental research on all topics related to all fields of physics. This is accomplished by rapid publication of short reports, called "Letters". Papers are published and available electronically one article at a time. When published in such a manner, the paper is available to be cited by other work. Three editors are listed for this journal: Jack Sandweiss, George Basbas, and Reinhardt B. Schuhmann. Physical Review Letters is an internationally read physics journal, describing a diverse readership. Advances in physics, as well as cross disciplinary developments, are disseminated weekly, via this publication. Topics covered by this journal are also the explicit titles for each

Publisher
American Physical Society
Country
United States
History
1958–present
Website
http://prl.aps.org/
Impact factor
7.328 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Scientists 'tune in' to proton spin precession

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a non-invasive way to measure the "spin tune" of polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—an important factor ...

Is there dark matter at the center of the Milky Way?

MIT physicists are reigniting the possibility, which they previously had snuffed out, that a bright burst of gamma rays at the center of our galaxy may be the result of dark matter after all.

Green hydrogen: Research to enhance efficiency

Laboratory experiments and a parabolic flight campaign have enabled an international team of researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) to gain new insights into water electrolysis, in which hydrogen ...

New instrument extends LIGO's reach

Just a year ago, the National Science Foundation-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, was picking up whispers of gravitational waves every month or so. Now, a new addition to the system is ...

page 1 from 50