France fires up push for renewable energies

April 25, 2016 by Céline Serrat
Environment Minister Segolene Royal said the number of wind farms would double in France, while electricity obtained from solar energy would triple

France announced Monday it was raising its renewable energy goals and would become the first country to issue "green bonds" to fund projects which benefit the enviroment.

French President Francois Hollande also confirmed that the country's oldest nuclear power plant, Fessenheim—which sits near the German and Swiss borders—would be closed.

Hollande was speaking at a national environment conference in Paris, where he sought to further carve out his country's role as a leader in energy transition after the signing of a global climate pact in Paris in December.

Also at the conference, Environment Minister Segolene Royal said a roadmap for France's energy transition up to 2023 would be published on Wednesday, with higher objectives than initially planned.

She said the number of wind farms would double in France, while electricity obtained from solar energy would triple.

The amount of used for heat production would increase by over 50 percent.

Hollande said that to achieve the goal of decreasing the share of nuclear energy in electricity production from 75 percent to 50 percent by 2025 "renewables must be increased even faster."

That goal was written into France's law, signed in August 2015.

The French conference comes four days after more than 170 nations signed a historic Paris climate deal to limit climate change in New York.

Hollande was the first to put his pen to paper and sign the deal and urged his counterparts to turn their promises into concrete action.

To show the way, he announced Monday that France would be the first country to issue "green bonds", which up until now have only been issued by companies or finance institutions such as the World Bank.

The proceeds of such bonds are used to finance projects to address .

"Paris could become the leader in green finance," said Pascal Canfin of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in France.

Hollande also announced that energy giant EDF would close several nuclear power stations from 2018, while others will see their lives extended.

He said the first to close would be Fessenheim, which Germany complained earlier this year was, at nearly 40-years-old, "too old to still be in operation".

Hollande had pledged to close Fessenheim by the end of his five-year term in 2017.

While sentiment in Germany has turned against , France remains a leading international proponent of atomic energy.

France has 19 made up of 58 nuclear reactors.

Explore further: France's oldest nuclear plant to close this year

Related Stories

France's Hollande outlines 'green' energy policy

September 14, 2012

President Francois Hollande Friday pledged to close France's oldest operational nuclear plant in 2016 and rejected seven proposals for shale gas exploration on health and environment concerns.

Recommended for you

EU copyright law passes key hurdle

June 20, 2018

A highly disputed European copyright law that could force online platforms such as Google and Facebook to pay for links to news content passed a key hurdle in the European Parliament on Wednesday.

12 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gkam
1 / 5 (7) Apr 25, 2016
The French are waking up.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Apr 25, 2016
France would be the first country to issue "green bonds"

Hmmm. Interesting idea. Will watching how that turns out.
WillieWard
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 25, 2016
It is also a good news for Germany as they can export more coal to France to compensate intermittency of eco-friendly bird-choppers/landscape-destroyers while they phase out carbon-free nuclear power.
gkam
1.5 / 5 (8) Apr 25, 2016
Willie should thank us for reducing the bird population. Here is one example:

http://www.cnn.co...hutdown/

Not a very secure source of power, is it?
gkam
1.5 / 5 (8) Apr 25, 2016
We shall see how it works out with both renewables and nuclear power in France. The relative costs and operational difficulties will be interesting.
WillieWard
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 25, 2016
..should thank us for reducing the bird population.
Wind farms can be very useful in order to prevent nasty birds from defecating on nuclear power plants by slaughtering or exploding their lungs with wind blades in midair.
gkam
1.5 / 5 (8) Apr 25, 2016
"Wind farms can be very useful in order to prevent nasty birds from defecating on nuclear power plants"
--------------------------------

Yup.

And in this case, it is the cost of a few birds versus losing New York City, directly downwind of your nukes.
WillieWard
2 / 5 (4) Apr 25, 2016
..losing New York City, directly downwind..
It seems now that anti-nuclear/pro-renewable lobbyists are relying only on scaremongering tactics, because nuclear power has statistically proven to be safer per unit of energy generated than any other source of energy even including Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents, and wind and solar were demonstrated not for free, not carbon-free neither ecologically friendly as they ruin natural landscapes and need to be backed by coal and other fossil fuels to compensate intermittency.
gkam
1.6 / 5 (7) Apr 25, 2016
Nope. It is always blowing and/or shining somewhere. And with an integrated system of renewables from geothermal and wind and PV and new energy-saving technologies such as LEDs, we will not need foreign fuel, will produce no pollutants and can avoid being held hostage by foreign powers with energy resources.

Yup, your favorite sources are Last Century Technologies, a lesson in the futility of brute-force engineering. They are now being either closed or reduced to second-tier resources, on the way out.
Shootist
2 / 5 (4) Apr 25, 2016
Build more fission plants. Problem solved.
Anda
5 / 5 (1) Apr 26, 2016
What a bunch of comments...
Use the force
antialias_physorg
3.7 / 5 (3) Apr 26, 2016
Build more fission plants. Problem solved.

Ooookay...how exactly is this going to help do:
Hollande said that to achieve the goal of decreasing the share of nuclear energy in electricity production from 75 percent to 50 percent by 2025

I mean: I know you post only stupid stuff. But would it be too much bother to first read the articles before posting stupid stuff? It won't change the stupidity of the stuff you post but it would certainly reduce the volume.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.