36 countries launch world alliance for geothermal energy

December 7, 2015
Part of the ol-Karia geothermal power generation complex is seen from a vantage point on the floor of the Kenyan Rift Valley, ne
Part of the ol-Karia geothermal power generation complex is seen from a vantage point on the floor of the Kenyan Rift Valley, near the shores of Lake Naivasha some 120 kilometers north-east of capital, Nairobi on August 28, 2015

Thirty-six countries gave the official start Monday to an initiative to promote geothermal energy in developing economies as a cleaner alternative to oil, gas and coal.

The Global Geothermal Alliance, launched on the sidelines of the UN climate talks in Le Bourget, aims at a sixfold increase in geothermal electricity production and a tripling of geothermal-derived heating by 2030.

At present, geothermal is growing modestly, at three to four percent per year, providing 12 gigawatts of electricity annually.

But this is just a fraction of its overall potential of 100 gigawatts, according to the industry. Only 24 out of 90 with geothermal potential actually use the resource.

The alliance said its members will seek to overcome "political uncertainty" about geothermal and strengthen the industry's skills base.

The Global Geothermal Alliance initiative was sketched out in September 2014 at a summit organised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

Members include countries on thermal "hotspots" in Africa, Southeast Asia and Latin America, ranging from Kenya and Tanzania to Malaysia, the Philippines and Guatemala.

Geothermal energy entails drilling into hot rock and using the heated water to generate electricity or provide heating for communities.

It is considered exceptionally clean, as the heat extraction process requires far lower emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) compared with fossil fuels.

It is also deemed sustainable, given the almost limitless source of the energy, although individual wells can cool down or run out of water.

Obstacles to geothermal are the high cost of drilling and risks entailed in the exploration phase.

"Geothermal development particularly in developing countries faces important challenges," the alliance said.

"Due to risks related to geological drilling during the exploration phase, along with the associated costs, financing the early stage of the process is limited to investors that understand and accept the possible associated risks."

Explore further: World Bank to raise $500 mn for geothermal energy

Related Stories

Indonesia passes law to tap volcano power

August 26, 2014

The Indonesian parliament on Tuesday passed a long-awaited law to bolster the geothermal energy industry and tap the power of the vast archipelago's scores of volcanoes.

Improving geothermal energy

April 28, 2015

Generating electricity from the hot rocks deep underground is clean, safe and renewable - and it's about to take a step forward in Utah.

Recommended for you

Enhancing solar power with diatoms

October 20, 2017

Diatoms, a kind of algae that reproduces prodigiously, have been called "the jewels of the sea" for their ability to manipulate light. Now, researchers hope to harness that property to boost solar technology.

Dutch open 'world's first 3D-printed bridge'

October 17, 2017

Dutch officials toasted on Tuesday the opening of what is being called the world's first 3D-printed concrete bridge, which is primarily meant to be used by cyclists.

21 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

djusko
3 / 5 (2) Dec 07, 2015
Geothermal energy, I hope this gets rid of the gas. There are better things to do with petroleum than burning it.
gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 08, 2015
Geothermal power is not completely clean. We have SO2 and Arsenic loading at The Geysers.
Shakescene21
not rated yet Dec 08, 2015
Geothermal also has the advantage that it's available 24/7/365, unlike solar and wind.
gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 08, 2015
At The Geysers, the water is condensed and re-used and is augmented by the wastewater from sewage plants.

With the amount of geothermal potential in Japan, why did they go to nukes?

MONEY!!

BIG MONEY.
djusko
1 / 5 (4) Dec 08, 2015
Alcohol is clean burning and cheap. Cold fusion is clean also, put some of our money into that research instead of giving it away.
Eikka
5 / 5 (2) Dec 12, 2015
MONEY!!

BIG MONEY.


You really can't have it both ways with your FUD, gkam.

By saying "big money", you imply that someone's making a lot of profit on it, but that can't be true because you're also claiming that nuclear power is too expensive to produce - unless you imply that it's artifically expensive, which means admitting that it's actually cheap and there's a conspiracy or a cartel going on.

The actual reason is that Japan needs much more power than what is practically available in geothermal energy. Japan uses up about 1000 TWh a year, which means 114 GW average production and a third of it came from nuclear power prior to the shutdown.

If the entire world's geothermal development potential is 100 GW, it's pretty clear that Japan couldn't have enough of it to really matter.
gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 12, 2015
Hitachi owns Westinghouse, and is tied to the government, like all big Japanese industries. Lots'a money trying to build nukes, tremendous amounts of capital tied up for long periods by established and entrenched nuclear engineering companies. Tell me how much is spent on Geothermal.

We do not really know the potential, because we have essentially just started exploration.
djusko
1 / 5 (2) Dec 12, 2015
Eikka, "gkam" told why geothermal wouldn't work in some areas. Sulphur Dioxide is serious.

I gave 2 examples of ways in which the area didn't matter and a new technology isn't invoked to rid us of nuclear waste. Alcohol has no waste matter and we can easily change any car from burning poisonous gas to alcohol.

Cold Fusion, which changes water to heat is the second example, that already has a prototype built.

"gkam", what about geothermal drilling in the colder parts of the earth, where the heat is high enough to boil water and there is no sulfur expelled? Does that put geothermal back in the running? Steam is a poor way to create electricity IMO. But the transported raw heat can be used, if it can be transported.
"Eikka", where did you get this information? "The entire world's geothermal development potential is 100 GW"? Here is 100 GW for the USA only.
http://energy.gov...ms-field
djusko
1 / 5 (2) Dec 12, 2015
"Even if we get to 1,000 GW of power, how is that going to aid our transportation power? Home to batteries for the car. That's one way.

Alcohol is easily made from our scraps. Revert back to alcohol stations instead of gas stations. That's another way.
A third way is with Cold Fusion, a water/nickel reaction produces so much heat, it is more than can be accounted for by chemical means. and therefore must be some type of new nuclear mechanism, for cold fusion is not like today's dirty and dangerous nuclear power."
http://coldfusion...-fusion/
Water and nickel is all that's needed.

Both systems are better than geothermal to stop global warming caused by poisonous gas, carbon monoxide and excess carbon dioxide.
gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 12, 2015

"gkam", what about geothermal drilling in the colder parts of the earth, where the heat is high enough to boil water and there is no sulfur expelled? Does that put geothermal back in the running

----------------------------------------
djusko, it has always been in the running. I like it.
djusko
not rated yet Dec 13, 2015
Yea, me too.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2015
Cold Fusion, which changes water to heat is the second example, that already has a prototype built.
@djusko
a prototype where?

can you link a REPUTABLE site that shows the working prototype functioning as promised giving a workable and scale-able generation of energy that will replace modern electrical generation plants (or even work for personal electrical generation)?

djusko
not rated yet Dec 13, 2015
Just Google cold fusion prototype, there are lots of them.
http://www.extrem...-million
Believe it or not, the first cold fusion power plant is now available to pre-order. The E-Cat 1MW Plant, which comes in a standard shipping container, can produce one megawatt of thermal energy, using low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) — a process, often known as cold fusion, that fuses nickel and hydrogen into copper, producing energy 100,000 times more efficiently than combustion. It sounds like E-Cat is now taking orders for delivery in early 2014, priced fairly reasonably at $1.5 million. Has cold fusion — the answer to all our energy needs — finally made its way to market?
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (2) Dec 13, 2015
http://www.extrem...-million
Believe it or not, the first cold fusion power plant is now available to pre-order
@djusko
1- i know about the e-cat
2- the e-cat has been available to "pre-order" for years (that article you linked is from 2013, and the e-cat has been taking "orders" for longer - the site indicates at LEAST since 2012)

so, it is NOT available... you can pay out the $$ but you can't get a working prototype
AND
there is still no definitively proven working prototype that you can actually get to prove that there are "working prototypes" either

then you must consider the source and the lack of evidence
and Mills machine is no better/different in this aspect (still no "working prototype")

a web site can make all the "claims" it wants, but until there is a working prototype an individual can actually purchase, study or use, it is just an UNTESTED CLAIM
see also: http://www.auburn...ion.html
Uncle Ira
4 / 5 (4) Dec 13, 2015
It sounds like E-Cat is now taking orders for delivery in early 2014, priced fairly reasonably at $1.5 million.


Well sure is a nice theory Skippy, except that in three weeks it be early 2016.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2015
Geothermal energy, I hope this gets rid of the gas. There are better things to do with petroleum than burning it.

Like what, Djusko? Plastics?
djusko
5 / 5 (1) Dec 13, 2015
Yea, among others. Plastic doesn't make a toxic byproduct does it?
How many different types of plastics are there anyway.
djusko
not rated yet Dec 13, 2015
Washington State University researchers have developed a catalyst that easily converts bio-based ethanol to a widely used industrial chemical, paving the way for more environmentally friendly, bio-based plastics and products.
http://phys.org/n...als.html
The industry has traditionally made a widely used chemical called isobutene - used in everything from plastic soda bottles to rubber tires - by superheating crude oil. But in collaboration with the Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) Company, Wang and his colleagues developed a catalyst to convert bio-based ethanol, which is made from corn or other biomass, to isobutene in one easy production step.
djusko
not rated yet Dec 13, 2015
Getting rid of gas.
Cold Fusion; Italian physicist and inventor Andrea Rossi has conducted a public demonstration of his "cold fusion" machine, the E-Cat, at the University of Bologna, showing that a small amount of input energy drives an unexplained reaction between atoms of hydrogen and nickel that leads to a large outpouring of energy, more than 10 times what was put in.

The physicists who were invited to the demonstration in April gave the E-Cat a solid thumbs-up. It produced too much excess heat to have been originating from a chemical process, they wrote in their report, adding that, "The only alternative explanation is that there is some kind of a nuclear process that gives rise to the measured energy production."

I saw it work on one of the first cold-fusion sites. There is a lot of evidence that says the E-Cat works.
djusko
not rated yet Dec 13, 2015
In January of 2014 it was announced that the American company Industrial Heat had acquired the licensing rights to his technology in the US, Russia and China. "The world needs a new, clean and efficient energy source. Such a technology would raise the standard of living in developing countries and reduce the environmental impact of producing energy," said JT Vaughn speaking on behalf of Industrial Heat (IH).
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2015
Yea, among others. Plastic doesn't make a toxic byproduct does it?
How many different types of plastics are there anyway.
have you never been sailing? taken a trip abroad to view the third world countries? where do you live?
are there NO beaches where you live?

are you serious or trying a not so inventive troll tactic?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.