Consumer Reports hits reliability of 'best car' Tesla

Consumer Reports "chronicled an array of detailed and complicated maladies" in the Model S, involving the drivetrain,
Consumer Reports "chronicled an array of detailed and complicated maladies" in the Model S, involving the drivetrain, power equipment, climate control, charging equipment, and the tablet-like computer screen in the dashboard

Two months after the influential Consumer Reports called Tesla's Model S the best-performing car ever, it pulled back slightly Tuesday, saying the luxury electric has more than average repair issues.

The independent consumer review group said a survey including about 1,400 Model S owners "chronicled an array of detailed and complicated maladies" in the Model S, involving the drivetrain, power equipment, climate control, charging equipment, and the tablet-like computer screen in the dashboard.

Owners also complained of "body and sunroof squeaks, rattles, and leaks," it said.

Tesla's shares quickly sank 11 percent to around $202 after Consumer Reports released its report, concluding that Teslas are likely to have a greater-than-average number of problems, with the 2015 model more afflicted than the 2014.

But the shares recovered half that to finish the day off 6.6 percent at $213.03.

Consumer Reports noted that the problems are almost all covered by the car's warranty, and it stood by its August declaration that, on drivability, comfort and performance, the $125,000 Model S P85D version "performed better in our tests than any other car ever has."

"With a six-figure price tag, the P85D is expensive, meaning its virtues will be experienced by a rare few. But its significance as a breakthrough that is pushing the boundaries of both performance and fuel-efficiency is dramatic," Consumer Reports said at the time.

Tesla's all-electric cars have ridden a wave of enthusiasm since hitting the market three years ago, each year topping Consumer Reports's annual car recommendations.

So the report Tuesday clearly disappointed investors confident in the future of the still money-losing company.

At the end of September Tesla unveiled its next car, two years later than expected. The Model X has already attracted thousands of pre-orders, even at a steep $130,000 price.

Trip Chowdhry, analyst at Global Securities, defended the company's strong outlook while not disputing Consumer Reports's conclusions.

"Customers buy Tesla knowing well that fit-and-finish is sub-par," he said. Yet owners still rave about their cars, he said.

"Tesla sales occur because of word-of-mouth from current Tesla owners, and not because of Consumer Reports or other reviewers," he said.


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Citation: Consumer Reports hits reliability of 'best car' Tesla (2015, October 20) retrieved 21 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-10-consumer-reliability-car-tesla.html
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Oct 21, 2015
Yeah, my electric car, the Super Thunder Doesn't Exist 5000, is superior to this in ever way. Oh wait, it doesn't exist, so I probably shouldn't complain. Now how will I take my political hatred of life out on everyone!? I know, I'll complain anyway!

This is all your fault, Obama.

Sounds to me like it's caught up to the reliability of Ford.

Oct 21, 2015
Yeah, my electric car, the Super Thunder Doesn't Exist 5000, is superior to this in ever way.
@SuperT
would love to read the brochure!
you should write one up!

i bet $$ you could generate income... crowdfunding

LMFAO

(sorry guys... had to. made me laugh! add any internet link and people like KBK and zeph will believe it wholeheartedly!)

Oct 25, 2015
"Customers buy Tesla knowing well that fit-and-finish is sub-par," he said. Yet owners still rave about their cars


They have yet to hit the trough of disillusionment in the hype cycle.

https://en.wikipe...pe_cycle

The technology trigger for the modern electric car was in the mid-90's and the upslope of the curve went all the way through the 00's, and now we're at the "peak of inflated expectations" where everyone basically ignores the failure of the companies to deliver an actual working product.

The reality is that Tesla still isn't making a profit, and despite promises every successive car they've released so far has not been cheaper than the last. Every other electric car maker is seeing minimal to no sales, and none of the fundamental issues like the limited raw material supply, recharging infrastructure, range, weight and cost of batteries, safety... etc. have been solved.

It's going to be "Who killed the electric car 2", by 2020.


Oct 25, 2015
One has to remember that the previous attempt, the GM EV1, Toyota RAV4, Chrysler TEVan, Chevrolet S-10, Nissan Altra, Honda EV Plus... all these were made simpy to meet California's CARB rules because they jumped the gun and said you have to make them. When the rules were lifted, the cars dissapeared.

All of them were commercially and practically still-born because they relied on nickel and lead batteries, with the related efficiency, performance, weight, cost and reliability issues, and of course environmental issues with lead and cadmium. For example, the replacement rate for lead-acid batteries in postal van use in California was 14 months, and there was no recycling for the spent batteries.

Lithium batteries only came out on the market around 1996 - 1998, with Nissan trying out the first prototype EV to use any. The price though was too steep at the time, and it will be for a number of years still.

Don't expect a practical and cheap EV on the market for another decade.

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