Fukushima dumps first batch of once-radioactive water in sea

Black smoke rises from reactor number three at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 after a tsunami crippled
Black smoke rises from reactor number three at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 after a tsunami crippled the plant

The operator of Japan's Fukushima on Monday began releasing previously radioactive groundwater from the crippled nuclear plant into the sea, saying a filtration process had made the discharge safe.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), which operates the plant in eastern Japan, said that on the first day it had released 850 tons of groundwater, which had become radioactive after flowing near the plant.

It was the first time the plant, whose reactors suffered meltdowns after a huge tsunami in 2011, had released filtered water into the sea after a years-long battle with fishermen, who feared it could destroy their livelihood.

TEPCO said the water was safe as it has been filtered through its Advanced Liquid Processing System, which removes highly radioactive substances like strontium and caesium but leaves in the less dangerous tritium.

Fishermen had argued that the discharge would heighten contamination concerns and hurt their already battered reputation. But they eventually bowed to pressure from TEPCO, which is struggling to find space to store tainted water.

"We have confirmed this underground water contains contaminants since it includes rainwater that has been exposed to rubble at the site. But its radiation levels are much lower than the water kept in the reactor buildings," said a TEPCO spokesman.

Monday's move is a milestone for the company, which has been struggling to handle some 300 tons of dirty water it has been extracting from the ground every day. Previously it was just added to huge tanks on site.

TEPCO has also previously pumped clean water from the ground and released it into the sea to stop it becoming contaminated.

But it has yet to find a solution to deal with the other 680,000 tons of highly radioactive water stored on site.

This includes water used to cool reactors when they were knocked out by a towering tsunami on March 11, 2011.

Local fishermen have still not agreed to any discharge of collected from the reactor buildings even after it is filtered.

The tsunami, following a 9.0 magnitude quake, triggered the world's worst nuclear disaster in a generation and prompted Tokyo to shut down the 50 reactors nationwide used to generate electricity.

Decommissioning of the crippled Fukushima reactors is expected to take decades. The compensation bill for residents—excluding the cost of the site's cleanup—now top $57 billion.


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Citation: Fukushima dumps first batch of once-radioactive water in sea (2015, September 14) retrieved 18 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-fukushima-dumps-batch-once-radioactive-sea.html
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Sep 14, 2015
Natural radioactivities of seas are more than Fukushima(20 mSv), Guarapari Beach (800 mSv natural radiation)
"Sea water is slightly radioactive: it contains a small but significant amount of radioactive elements that undergo spontaneous radioactive decay and produce energy, subatomic particles, and a remainder, or daughter nucleus, smaller than the original. The particles include alpha particles (two neutrons plus two protons), beta particles (electrons), and gamma energy."
"Nearly all of the radioactive material in the ocean is natural, and represents material that has been on Earth since its formation."
http://www.watere...ean.html
"..alpha radiation from naturally occurring Polonium-210 is more damaging to biological tissues than gamma radiation from Cesium-137."
"..a little less than the amount a person receives from natural sources."
http://www.deepse...isaster/

Sep 14, 2015
First of many to come from the Fukushima crisis.
Yes, natural radioactivity exists as in coal fly ash and emissions from coal plants but perhaps that is why volcanoes are the primary extictors of life in the past. Consider that 70,000 y ago Toba blew and the human life bottlenecked. 40,000 y ago Plagaran Field volcanoes blew and the Neanders extincted in Europe. The rest of the human huddled on Doggerland which shed humans as it sank.
41,000 y ago the LeChamps global reversal of hundreds of years may have left us with a right brain emphasis over the previous left. The Chauvin cave art is no different from our advanced art. Can we withstand another drop in ntelligence? We cant even replicate ancient buildings today. It is not a warming so much to worry about, it is the intelligence drop that keeps us from finding solutions to it. Flowers for Algernon.

Sep 14, 2015
Natural radioactivities of seas are more than Fukushima(20 mSv), Guarapari Beach (800 mSv natural radiation)

However the highly radioactive substances tend to accumulate in biological processes. So the background radioactivity is a completely irrelevant measure, here.

The relevant measure is: how much of this stuff will end up in your sushi?

Sep 14, 2015
the background radioactivity is a completely irrelevant measure
Human body contains natural radioactive elements (Potassium-40, Carbon-14, Rubidium-87, Lead-210, Tritium, Uranium-238, Radium-228, Radium-226, etc.)
http://rerowland....vity.htm

Human body also emits natural gamma rays:
"All of us have a number of naturally occurring radionuclides within our bodies. The major one that produces penetrating gamma radiation that can escape from the body is a radioactive isotope of potassium, called potassium-40. This radionuclide has been around since the birth of the earth and is present as a tiny fraction of all the potassium in nature."
http://hps.org/pu...ods.html

Sep 14, 2015
Natural radioactivities of seas are more than Fukushima(20 mSv), Guarapari Beach (800 mSv natural radiation)..

Completely different. Fukushima is at the number 1 top pacific ocean dumping limit for tritium, which is water soluble. Guarapari beach radioactivity is locked in the concentrated heavy elements of the eroding sands. So simply put, if you take a cup of sea water off of Guarapari beach, you may measure 0.2 mSv while that of Fukushima could be 20 mSv.

Sep 14, 2015
These idiots will poison all of us, if we let them.

And it's all for MONEY!! Human lives for corporate profit and political expedience.

Sep 14, 2015
Completely different. Fukushima is at the number 1 top pacific ocean dumping limit for tritium, which is water soluble.


It's not water soluble - it is water. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen and as such it's part of the H2O molecule itself, so it cannot be filtered or distilled out by any practical means.

However, its radioactivity is limited. It's a beta (electron) emitter with a half-life of about 12 years and energy of about 0.0186 MeV, as compared to things like Cesium-137 which is a hundred times more energetic at 1.176 MeV.

We use it in safety exit signs, keychains, map lights, gun sights and sports watches to light up the dials because it makes fluorescent materials glow weakly.

Guarapari beach radioactivity is locked in the concentrated heavy elements of the eroding sands


The tritium in the water is a result of neutron capture from the radioactive decay of the heavier radioactive elements such as uranium, so tritium would be present there

Sep 14, 2015
And it's all for MONEY!! Human lives for corporate profit and political expedience.


Crocodile tears.

Sep 14, 2015
"Crocodile tears. "
---------------------------------

Do you think that because you do not care, the rest of do not care for people? Many of us earned our degrees in the field to find ways to prevent this poisoning of the environment.

Sep 14, 2015
However the highly radioactive substances tend to accumulate in biological processes. So the background radioactivity is a completely irrelevant measure, here.


It's the same highly radioactive substances that are responsible for the background radiation in places like Guarapari beach.

Natural background radiation from radionuclides is almost exactly the same stuff because naturally occurring uranium and thorium break down spontaneously to plutonium, polonium, radium, radon, cesium... and there's actually many times more of these radioactive materials on that beach than on Fukushima - it's just mixed in and more diluted.

The relevant measure is: how much of this stuff will end up in your sushi?


Probably pico or femtograms - as it becomes diluted in billions of tons of seawater. That much tritium you already have in you anyways.

Sep 14, 2015
Do you think that because you do not care, the rest of do not care for people?


I do care.

You don't. You don't give a rat's ass that more people die every year because of other means of energy production - including renewable energy - than from nuclear energy, or that the cost of the renewable energy policies you advocate are putting millions of people into poverty, and ultimately illness and death.

But when it's radioactivity we're talking about it's like watching gypsy wailing women at a funeral precession.

You're hamming it up.

Many of us earned our degrees in the field to find ways to prevent this poisoning of the environment.


You didn't.

Sep 14, 2015
Yeah, I did, after working with the NRC and the DCPA on contract research. We clearly needed to shift our focus onto sustainability, although the term was not current then.

Sep 14, 2015
Natural radioactivities of seas are more than Fukushima(20 mSv), Guarapari Beach (800 mSv natural radiation)

However the highly radioactive substances tend to accumulate in biological processes. So the background radioactivity is a completely irrelevant measure, here.

The relevant measure is: how much of this stuff will end up in your sushi?
However the 'backround radiation' in seawater is from suspended radionuclides which are also taken up by marine organisms and concentrate there.
http://aslo.net/l...0028.pdf

-Your sushi is already contaminated. Perhaps you should switch to polar bear chopped liver?

Sep 14, 2015
Yeah, I did, after working with the NRC and the DCPA on contract research. We clearly needed to shift our focus onto sustainability, although the term was not current then.
ANOTHER new undisclosed job george? This makes - what - 23 that you lost?

And what could a job shopper learn of value in such a job? Your declaration does not make that clear. Were you fiddling with knobs and tapping dials the whole time?

Sep 14, 2015
Do you think that because you do not care, the rest of do not care for people? Many of us earned our degrees in the field to find ways to prevent this poisoning of the environment
But you did not earn your degree in the field. You proved as much to ira in this thread...
http://phys.org/n...ack.html

"the school he got the degree from (is a good school mind you) gives out an official Master of Science in Environmental Management.(That is what he called two different times here). But that school ALSO awards out Master of Science Professional Studies as part of a "life experience for credit" program. That's the one I saw the picture of."

-What makes you think we would ever let THIS lie go?

Sep 14, 2015
If you want to play bleeding hearts, gkam, how about for these guys?

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/04/01/article-1166387-03D2CD1C000005DC-409_634x372.jpg
In the parched hills of Chile's northern region the damage caused by lithium mining is immediately clear. As you approach one of the country's largest lithium mines the white landscape gives way to what appears to be an endless ploughed field. Huge mountains of discarded bright white salt rise out of the plain. The cracked brown earth of the site crumbles in your hands. There is no sign of animal life anywhere. The scarce water has all been poisoned by chemicals leaked from the mine.

Huge channels and tracts have been cut into the desert, each running with heavily polluted water. The blue glow of chlorine makes the water look almost magical, but these glistening pools are highly toxic.


Do you think they'll live long and healthy lives?

Sep 14, 2015
"Do you think that because you do not care, the rest of do not care for people? Many of us earned our degrees in the field to find ways to prevent this poisoning of the environment.


Yet the said poisoning is happening. Earning degrees in the field doesn't seem to be enough.
They should have asked for international help, advices, storage means to decontaminate as much as possible that water. Dumping it like that because "Fuck it, it wastes space to keep it!" is completely dangerous. TEPCO should never take care of that reactor EVER again. The way they manage it since the accident shows the need of more experienced and responsible people to take over.

Sep 14, 2015
"Master of Science Professional Studies as part of a "life experience for credit" program. "
-------------------------------------

It does not!

Why do you uneducated goobers try your silly games? Because that is how you would get one?

What have you done, otto?

Nothing you can admit, apparently.

Sep 16, 2015
What have you done, otto?
Well I havent gone to the effort of providing goobers with evidence of a 'Master of Science Professional Studies as part of a "life experience for credit" program', and claiming that it was a 'Master of Science in Environmental Management', because I thought those goobers were too stupid to know the difference.

You lied. Again. You were found out. Again.

This makes you look like an ignorant fool with serious psychological problems.

Which you most obviously are.

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