Most Australian workers lack faith in their boss

February 20, 2014 by Ryan Sheales

Australian workers believe their workplaces suffer from poor leadership and need better management, according to a survey into workplace management by the Centre for Workplace Leadership at the University of Melbourne. 

The found that 75% of Australian workers believe that their workplaces need both better management and leadership. 

The representative survey of over 2,000 workers found a quarter of the Australian workforce do not have someone in their they look up to as a good leader, while 35% of senior and middle managers also lacked a workplace role model. 

"Australian workers lack faith in their leaders," said Professor Peter Gahan, the Director of the Centre for Workplace Leadership. 

"Leadership is the often neglected ingredient in productivity with studies showing that employees who have greater job satisfaction and motivation create workplaces that have productivity gains of 30%."

The survey findings are being released today to mark the official launch of the Centre for Workplace Leadership by the Federal Employment Minister, Senator Eric Abetz.   

University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor Glyn Davis said the Centre for is an exciting venture. 

Most Australian workers lack faith in their boss

"Created as a co-investment between the Commonwealth Government, the University of Melbourne and industry, the Centre for Workplace Leadership represents an exciting innovation in how we generate and harness new insights and thinking around leadership," he said. 

"We want to provide an opportunity for all Australian workplaces, irrespective of their size or location, to access cutting edge ideas through robust research, and mobilise them in practical ways in the workplace" said Professor Gahan. 

"We have already developed pioneering partnerships with Cisco and Bendigo & Adelaide Bank, among others, but the Centre is strongly aiming to help small and medium enterprises in particular to fulfil their productivity potential through smarter training and " continued Professor Gahan. 

Explore further: Report finds workplace discrimination cuts deep across Australia

Related Stories

Racial differences exist in reports of workplace drug testing

September 26, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Drug testing occurs more often in workplaces where racial and ethnic minorities are employed, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine. The study appears online in the Early View of the American ...

Freedom's just another word for employee satisfaction

January 24, 2011

Workers who feel they have autonomy – that they are free to make choices in the workplace and be accountable for them – are happier and more productive according to an extensive research literature review. Yet there's ...

Outdoor workers face increased cancer risk

February 5, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Perth researchers have completed a comprehensive study into Australian workers and their exposure to ultraviolet radiation - a known human carcinogen.

Recommended for you

Neanderthal boy's skull grew like a human child's: study

September 21, 2017

The first analysis of a Neanderthal boy's skull uncovered in Spain suggests that he grew much like a modern boy would, in another sign that our extinct ancestors were similar to us, researchers said Thursday.

Early trilobites had stomachs, new fossil study finds

September 21, 2017

Exceptionally preserved trilobite fossils from China, dating back to more than 500 million years ago, have revealed new insights into the extinct marine animal's digestive system. Published today in the journal PLOS ONE, ...

Big herbivorous dinosaurs ate crustaceans as a side dish

September 21, 2017

Some big plant-eating dinosaurs roaming present-day Utah some 75 million years ago were slurping up crustaceans on the side, a behavior that may have been tied to reproductive activities, says a new University of Colorado ...

Solving the Easter Island population puzzle

September 20, 2017

Easter Island, known as Rapa Nui by its inhabitants, has been surrounded in mystery ever since the Europeans first landed in 1722. Early visitors estimated a population of just 1,500-3,000, which seemed at odds with the nearly ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.