Research highlights the economic costs of workplace bullying

Findings from a new NUI Galway study on workplace bullying, led by Dr. John Cullinan of the Discipline of Economics and Dr. Margaret Hodgins from the Discipline of Health Promotion, has been published in the journal Occupational ...

When older people feel excluded at work

Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons. They feel particularly excluded when they believe that their cognitive abilities decrease with age, as psychologists from the University ...

Is workplace rudeness on the rise?

You don't have to look hard to see uncivil behavior these days, whether in political discourse, in college classrooms or on airplanes. One study found that rudeness is even contagious, like the common cold.

Nearly half of accused harassers can return to work

What happens behind the scenes when employees are accused of harassment? New research from Michigan State University revealed that almost half of accused harassers can go back to work when disputes are settled by arbitrators—or, ...

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Employment

Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. An employee may be defined as: "A person in the service of another under any contract of hire, express or implied, oral or written, where the employer has the power or right to control and direct the employee in the material details of how the work is to be performed." Black's Law Dictionary page 471 (5th ed. 1979).

In a commercial setting, the employer conceives of a productive activity, generally with the intention of generating a profit, and the employee contributes labour to the enterprise, usually in return for payment of wages. Employment also exists in the public, non-profit and household sectors. To the extent that employment or the economic equivalent is not universal, unemployment exists.

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