Managers must listen to workers of all ages on COVID-19 safety

The workplace is full of psychological hazards, including abusive supervisors and mistreatment from customers. But there are also physical hazards like falls from heights, working with faulty equipment and exposure to harsh ...

Women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, study finds

A Dartmouth-Gallup study finds that women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, a difference that transcends party lines. This female perspective towards the pandemic may be overlooked due to the underrepresentation ...

Research highlights the economic costs of workplace bullying

Findings from a new NUI Galway study on workplace bullying, led by Dr. John Cullinan of the Discipline of Economics and Dr. Margaret Hodgins from the Discipline of Health Promotion, has been published in the journal Occupational ...

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Employment

Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. An employee may be defined as: "A person in the service of another under any contract of hire, express or implied, oral or written, where the employer has the power or right to control and direct the employee in the material details of how the work is to be performed." Black's Law Dictionary page 471 (5th ed. 1979).

In a commercial setting, the employer conceives of a productive activity, generally with the intention of generating a profit, and the employee contributes labour to the enterprise, usually in return for payment of wages. Employment also exists in the public, non-profit and household sectors. To the extent that employment or the economic equivalent is not universal, unemployment exists.

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