Japan researchers invent solar-cell fabric

Japanese researchers say their solar-cell fabric would eventually let wearers harvest energy on the go
Image provided by Sphelar Power on December 11 shows small spherical solar cells woven into a piece of fabric. The new fabric is made of wafer-thin solar cells woven together that could see people powering up their electronics with their sweater or trousers.

Clothes that could literally light up your life were unveiled Tuesday by Japanese researchers who said their solar-cell fabric would eventually let wearers harvest energy on the go.

The new fabric is made of wafer-thin woven together that could see people powering up their mobile phones and other electronics with their sweater or trousers.

But its creators conceded there was work to do before taking the fabric to market.

"We still have things to solve before commercialisation, such as coating for the conductive wires and improving the fabric's durability," said an official at the Industrial Technology Center in central Japan's Fukui Prefecture.

"But we've already been contacted by electronics makers, blind makers and others who showed interested in our invention."

The centre developed the fabric with a Kyoto-based solar cell maker and other private firms, the official said.

is attracting renewed attention in Japan as the country looks to in the aftermath of last year's tsunami-sparked atomic crisis, the worst nuclear accident in a generation.


Explore further

Cotton is the fabric of your lights... your iPod... your MP3 player... your cell phone

(c) 2012 AFP

Citation: Japan researchers invent solar-cell fabric (2012, December 11) retrieved 29 September 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-japan-solar-cell-fabric.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments