Poland plans its first atomic power plant on Baltic

Poland currently relies on its plentiful coal reserves to generate 94 percent of its electricity
View of the Belchatow power plant in Belchatow, near Lodz central Poland. Poland's first nuclear power plant, due to come on line by 2020, is set to be located near the Baltic Sea, Polish energy group PGE said.

Poland's first nuclear power plant, due to come on line by 2020, is set to be located near the Baltic Sea, Polish energy group PGE said on Friday.

Three potential sites near the coast, at Zarnowiec, Choczewo and Gaski, were picked from around a hundred proposed locations, PGE chief Tomasz Zadroga told reporters.

The final choice is due to be announced in around two years, when the winner of the bidding race to build the plant will also be revealed, he said.

State-controlled PGE, which is in charge of Poland's programme, is set to launch the tender process before the end of this year.

Poland, a nation of 38 million people, currently relies on its plentiful to generate 94 percent of its electricity.

The ex-communist country, which joined the European Union in 2004, aims to construct two 3,000-megawatt reactors.

The cost of the nuclear programme is estimated at 100 billion zloty (22.1 billion euros, $29.4 billion)

Three international consortia have already expressed an interest in the project: France's EDF and Areva, US-Japanese Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, and US-Japanese GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas.

The nuclear option is strategic for Poland.

One goal is to meet EU quotas for cutting the country's , a tough task in a coal-fired economy.

The government's energy policy also involves reducing the role of energy imports.

Poland currently relies on Russia to cover 40 percent of its gas needs, for example, while other importers supply 30 percent and its own resources account for 30 percent.


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Citation: Poland plans its first atomic power plant on Baltic (2011, November 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-poland-atomic-power-baltic.html
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Nov 25, 2011
Oops. The efforts of Germany and Danemark to go nuclear free is now useless, nuclear radiation does not care about artificial borders in case of accidents.

Nov 25, 2011
The government's energy policy also involves reducing the role of energy imports
The Poland is already a largest exporter of energy and polluters of life environment in Europe. The Poland is building these plants just for money and it plays a role European China in many aspects, not just with respect to its economical emigration.

http://disc.sci.g...obal.jpg

Nov 25, 2011
Poland, a nation of 38 million people, currently relies on its plentiful coal reserves to generate 94 percent of its electricity.


Nice to see Poland trying to lower its carbon footprint, it was about time.

Nov 25, 2011
At the case of Fukushima-type disaster the things would become quite interesting, because the Baltic sea is relatively shallow and closed.

Nov 25, 2011
Oops. The efforts of Germany and Danemark to go nuclear free is now useless, nuclear radiation does not care about artificial borders in case of accidents.

How is it useless? Turn off 20 old power plants - build one new one. Not as good as a 20 to zero ratio but still WAY better than nothing.

Given the area of radiation fallout and major contamination after an accident it is still preferrable to have that happen in Poland (on the far side of Poland to boot) than right in the middle of your own country.

Nov 25, 2011
Asian and second or third grade countries are building nuclear power stations, gaming their chances on the advancements make in technology. On the other hand, first world countries are turning their backs on nuclear while still fiddling with smal-scale renewables. Great news for the oil and coal power stations there!

Nov 25, 2011
These countries won't be "nuclear-free" until they stop importing power generated by nukes. Europe is too small for NIMBY to be meaningful.

Nov 27, 2011
Nice to see Poland trying to lower its carbon footprint, it was about time.
That's what Iran is trying to do as well, but Israel and the US/English oil interests won't have it.

Nov 29, 2011
Nice to see...but Israel and the US/English oil interests won't have it.


Please take a course of politics 101 for the 21st century, will you? Basically, you will try to crowbar, hinder and apply wholesale effort to demonize your enemy's advancements (or wish to) in whatsoever fields, by whatsoever means. Choice methods are your owned press and political pressure, assassinations of key personnel, blowing up installations (you get away every time if none can prove it conclusively, your owned press can always whitewash, censor muddle or deny the whole thing ever happened.) Never mind whether their endeavors are lawful or not, they ARE the enemy! Laws (can always be rewritten) be damned! And if you repeat your allegations 1000 times, 100,000 times, some dills will believe it and vote you in office, authorize bombing the upstart shit back to the Stone Age. Then, all will be well! From whatever hole you have been living in, welcome to the 21st century's alpha monkey polictics!

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