Toshiba makes a breakthrough in hard-drive capacity

Aug 23, 2010 by John Messina weblog
Future Toshiba drives could hold five times as much data using bit-patterned media technology.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Last Wednesday Toshiba made an announcement at the Magnetic Recording Conference in San Diego that they have made a breakthrough in their research of bit-patterned media that would result in enormous storage improvements for future hard drives.

Toshiba is currently developing a bit-patterned media that makes a smaller collection of grains that is used to record the magnetic charge for each bit. has currently achieved an of 2.5Tbit per square inch by using magnetic dots 17nm in size. This is equivalent to about 300GB stored in an area approximately the size of a postage stamp which is about five times of what is available today on high-capacity drives which store about 541Gb per square inch.

Currently Toshiba has only been able to detect the tracks on the prototype media and still needs to develop the technology for reading and writing to the tracks. If Toshiba succeeds in the bit-patterned media technology, they will have a head-start in producing ultra-high-capacity storage drives for those who need terabytes of data.

Research and creation of a prototype bit-patterned media has already been done by other manufactures before but Toshiba’s work represents the first time a prototype device has been created with the magnetic spheres aligned in a specific pattern. This alignment was missing from previous prototypes making it impossible to find where particular data is stored.

Toshiba's work is far from completion but the company claims that the first products using this technology won't be available until at least 2013. Toshiba claims to be a lot closer than others in their in gathering usable signals from data stored on the magnetic spheres through a specially constructed read/write head.

Explore further: Oculus Rift users to see Moon live through robot

More information: Via: Bit-Tech & eetimes

Related Stories

Toshiba Introduces 320GB 1.8-inch HDD

Nov 05, 2009

Toshiba Corporation today introduced a new line up of 1.8-inch HDDs with a maximum capacity of 320GB, the highest yet announced by the industry, targeted at thin and light mobile PCs and portable external ...

Recommended for you

Oculus Rift users to see Moon live through robot

10 hours ago

A group from Carnegie Mellon wants to send a robot to the Moon to beam live pictures of the Moon to Oculus Rift headset users, reported technology reporter Jane Wakefield of the BBC. Andy the robot is intended ...

Skin icons can tap into promise of smartwatch

Oct 21, 2014

You have heard it before: smartwatches are cool wearables but critics remind us of the fact that their small size makes many actions cumbersome and they question how many people will really have them on their ...

Japan firm showcases Bat-Signal of the future

Oct 20, 2014

A free-floating image created by firing lasers into thin air was unveiled in Japan on Monday, offering the possibility one day of projecting messages into a cloudless sky, as seen in Batman.

User comments : 7

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DonR
5 / 5 (3) Aug 24, 2010
Just a small thing, John, but when you include two numbers and use them in a comparative context, don't change the units. It defeats the point of comparing them.
tigger
5 / 5 (3) Aug 24, 2010
Agreed, that was a horrible comparison jumping between units and postage stamps and square inches.... we've got Tbit, GB and Gb in the span of two sentences.

Anyway, it sounds like good progress by Toshiba... though I'm betting solid state will surpass in value and quality before too many more years pass.

El_Nose
not rated yet Aug 24, 2010
I gave you both 5's -- but upon rereading I am sure you both noted that the comparison is acually made in the article
achieved an areal density of 2.5Tbit per square inch by using magnetic dots 17nm in size. This is equivalent to about 300GB stored in an area approximately the size of a postage stamp which is about five times of what is available today on high-capacity drives which store about 541Gb per square inch.


2.5Tbit per square inch -> is 5x -> 541Gb per square inch
gunslingor1
not rated yet Aug 24, 2010
IN CREASE THE FREAKING READ SPEEDS ALREADY!!
DaveGee
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
I gave you both 5's -- but upon rereading I am sure you both noted that the comparison is acually made in the article 2.5Tbit per square inch -> is 5x -> 541Gb per square inch


Okay but perhaps you could enlighten us all on WHY it was so pressing to jump from pillar to post back to pillar etc. Since everyone knows mixing units of measure can only lead to confusion I'm still not seeing a benefit for doing it... unless perhaps you can point to a noteworthy scientist who actually encourages his lab techs to switch between units as much as humanly possible in their lab notes and journal paper submissions cause it makes you sound .... More important maybe???

I must say it certainly was creative of you to then go from 'about the size of a postage stamp' to 1 sq inch... Would that postage stamp be a square first class US stamp or one of those rectangular stamps with pretty flowers or cats? Or are we talking about those funky airmail stamps that you from people in Europe etc.. :)
DaveGee
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
Did you know that I'm Five Foot and 5 million 290 thousand mm tall give or take a cm, or just about as tall as a bookcase... Wow that certainly felt impressive while I typed it... ;)
sender
not rated yet Aug 30, 2010
nematic liquid polymers could make this molecular instead of nanometered, suppose all that remains is making a sharp liquid-nanoprism waveguide to manipulate the data