Report: Wind farms to power British homes

Dec 10, 2007

Britain's secretary of business reportedly is backing a plan to have wind farms power all homes in the United Kingdom within 13 years.

John Hutton, who previously opposed the plan, is to announce Monday he is opening the seas around Britain to wind farms to reduce reliance on other energy forms, including nuclear power, The Independent reported Sunday.

The project would be the world's largest renewable energy initiative and would help achieve the European Union target of providing 20 percent of Britain's energy from renewable resources by 2020, the British newspaper reported.

Monday's announcement is to come amid talks in Bali between 190 nations negotiating a new agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.

The British plan calls for wind farms to produce 25 gigawatts of electricity by 2020, which would make Britain's offshore wind industry twice the size of that of any other nation within eight years, The Independent reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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