Video: How do snowflakes form?

January 21, 2016
Credit: The American Chemical Society

A huge snowstorm could dump more than two feet of snow all over the East Coast, and that means trillions and trillions of tiny snowflakes.

Through advances in , scientists have learned a lot about the structure of snowflakes.

While they all start pretty much the same, once they start crystallizing, it's true that no two snowflakes are alike. In fact, the number of possible shapes is staggering.

Put down the shovel, grab the cocoa and get snowed in with Reactions:

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Explore further: Lovely ‘snowfakes’ mimic nature, advance science

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