Philips LED bulb with rad design set for January arrival

Dec 17, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —Netherlands-based Philips' SlimStyle LED bulbs will be arriving on January 2 at Home Depot stores, and the SlimStyle appears to be a promising newcomer in lightbulbs, with a flat design, energy-saving benefits. and ease of use for consumers. Intended as a replacement for 60- watt incandescents, SlimStyle is highly efficient; it uses only 10.5 watts, yet still puts out 800 lumens.

This lightbulb is shaped such that a string of LEDs are arranged into a horseshoe shape that arc out from the base. The shape is not just about grabbing attention; the technical advantage is that the SlimStyle does a good job in dispersing heat and does away with the need for heavy heat sinks. In a GigaOM report on the SlimStyle, a Philips spokeswoman e-mailed comments about the bulb's "The flat surface," she said, "helps conduct heat away from the LEDs, eliminating the need for the heavy aluminum heat sinks associated with LED bulbs. This eliminates the cost of the bulb, while still delivering omnidirectional light."

Illumination in Focus further reflected on the significance of the design: "Philips has once again created an LED-based retrofit lamp with a novel shape that still delivers an omnidirectional beam that the company expects to win Energy Star certification. The design looks somewhat akin to a doughnut on top of an Edison base although there is only a flat area rather than a whole in the center of the doughnut. The solid-state lighting (SSL) design enabled a new approach to thermal management that does not rely on a visible metal sink."

Chris Davies, meanwhile, writing in SlashGear, had a look at the SlimStyle, and observed still another advantage in its design, and that is its ease of use for those who may otherwise struggle with conventional bulbs. The elderly or infirm with weak grips, for example, might find the SlimStyle easier to manage with just a twist. The plastic body, too, will feel sturdy enough so that the user does not worry about cracking or breaking the bulb while handling it.

The introduction comes at a good time for Philips, as 2014 in the US also marks the point when 60- and 40-watt will be phased out. In 2014, the bulb will no longer be manufactured or imported. That also means that consumers in 2014 will be especially interested in finding alternative "green" LED fixtures and can expect promotional messages of better efficiency, The phaseout is In line with the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.This Act is designed to help raise the efficiency of products, buildings, and vehicles.

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User comments : 28

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chardo137
3.3 / 5 (7) Dec 17, 2013
"The flat surface," she said, "helps conduct heat away from the LEDs, eliminating the need for the heavy aluminum heat sinks associated with LED bulbs. This eliminates the cost of the bulb, while still delivering omnidirectional light."

So if it eliminates the cost of the bulb, then they must be free.

"The design looks somewhat akin to a doughnut on top of an Edison base although there is only a flat area rather than a whole in the center of the doughnut."

I like the concept of a "whole" in the center of a doughnut. It is probably one of the things that Stephen Hawking and Homer Simpson discussed when they got together.
Moebius
1 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2013
That is one ugly bulb. Not that ugly always stops sales, ugly doesn't seem to hurt most of chrysler's current cars, but I think people are not going to like this bulb.
bertibus
3 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2013
Nice technology but one vital nugget of information missing from the article: What will be the bulb's retail price?
LariAnn
3 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2013
That is one ugly bulb. Not that ugly always stops sales, ugly doesn't seem to hurt most of chrysler's current cars, but I think people are not going to like this bulb.

One person's ugly is another person's futuristic. I look forward to seeing these in action and hope they turn out to be as good as, or better than, their hype!
bearly
1.7 / 5 (11) Dec 17, 2013
"60- and 40-watt incandescent bulbs will be phased out."
We have already "lost" the 100w and 75w bulbs thanks to our Big Brother government mentality. When do we say enough and throw the bums out ?
EVERYONE should read George Orwells book 1984, and wake up to the loss of your freedoms.
Bob_Wallace
3 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2013
Home Depot is already selling 60 watt replacement bulbs by Cree which use 9.5 watts and come in multiple color temperatures. They look like an old-fashioned incandescent bulb, the type we used in the previous century.
Bob_Wallace
3.3 / 5 (10) Dec 17, 2013
"60- and 40-watt incandescent bulbs will be phased out."
We have already "lost" the 100w and 75w bulbs thanks to our Big Brother government mentality. When do we say enough and throw the bums out ?
EVERYONE should read George Orwells book 1984, and wake up to the loss of your freedoms.


Yep, you lost your freedom to waste energy and contribute to global warming.

Poor, poor you.

Had you done the right thing on your own we wouldn't have had to take your inefficient incandescent bulb away. We, the People. We are the government.
DonGateley
3.7 / 5 (3) Dec 17, 2013
Why no 100 watt equivalents (1750 lumens)? That's what I expect from a socket and what I'll put to use if ever I can get them.
Bob_Wallace
2.5 / 5 (2) Dec 17, 2013
The way the law was written the smaller wattage bulbs switched over first.

I think they may have already quit manufacturing 100 watt incandescents (or it's happening very soon) and the last stock is working its way through the system.

I've seen a couple 100 watt replacement LEDs but they're still pretty expensive. I'm sticking with my 100 watt replacement CFLs in some lamps for now. My guess is that by next summer we'll have larger watt LEDs under $20. Right now the 100 watt replacement LEDs (19 watts) at Home Depot are over $30.
JRi
1 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2013
Why are all these LED bulb manufacturers advertising only 40W and 60W versions, when most people in reality are looking for versions of 100W and above? And when talking about efficiency, they should not forget the comparison to fluorecent bulbs as well, or CRI-index.
FainAvis
3 / 5 (2) Dec 18, 2013
Yeah, what's the price. When the new fangled bulbs came out they were too expensive for my neighbor so he pinched my porch light, but it was a dead one. So I replaced it with another dead one. And another. When I used a physically tiny bulb from inside the fridge I heard him swear.
alfie_null
3.7 / 5 (3) Dec 18, 2013
"60- and 40-watt incandescent bulbs will be phased out."
We have already "lost" the 100w and 75w bulbs thanks to our Big Brother government mentality. When do we say enough and throw the bums out ?
EVERYONE should read George Orwells book 1984, and wake up to the loss of your freedoms.

Regarding dystopias, there are lots that feature anarchy too. Probably a good idea to read a mix, so you get a balanced perspective. This move to replace incandescents, it's not just one country, but much of the developed world.

I guess you could emigrate to a third world country. In which case you might well get a dictator. But one who permits incandescent lights.
mathematics2014
3 / 5 (2) Dec 18, 2013
Here's the problem; I can't pay more than $10 for at least FOUR light bulbs. Incandescent light bulbs are cheap. I (and most Americans) live paycheck to paycheck. We can't afford $20-30 per fixture just to light up our homes. It's ridiculous. If you're affluent, fine; be green. The Chinese poor earn more than the American middle class. The government needs to step out of these affairs.
mathematics2014
1 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2013
Dystopia? LOL We are already there. Half million dollar houses? Forty thousand dollar vehicles? Really? That's middle class? It's a joke. Middle class used to be if you worked hard, you could own your own house and car. Looks like the richies win again.
mathematics2014
1 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2013
$50 per bulb? LOL Holy shit.
cees_timmerman
1 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2013
I have a couple of old (2008?) GU10 LED spots from Philips, and compared to GP LEDs, they're too red and blue, similar to a recent 4 euro purchase from China (one with many flat diodes), but that one has an angle greater than even old halogen spots.

For high-power floodlights, induction with or without phosphor is best.
Bob_Wallace
3.8 / 5 (4) Dec 18, 2013
Here's the problem; I can't pay more than $10 for at least FOUR light bulbs. Incandescent light bulbs are cheap. I (and most Americans) live paycheck to paycheck. We can't afford $20-30 per fixture just to light up our homes. It's ridiculous.


Mr./Ms. Mathematics - do the math.

Get one <$10 (9.5w/60w replacement) LED from Home Depot. Put it in a lamp that is used ~4 hours per day. You'll save 50.5 watts x 4 hours x 365 days x 12c/kWh or $8.85 in electricity plus the cost of the incandescent(s) you didn't have to purchase.

The first year.

You pay the same for the first year as you will if you continue to use incandescents.

The next year and the 15+ following years you will have and extra $9+ to spend on things other than electricity and light bulbs.
Scott_L
5 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2013

Mr./Ms. Mathematics - do the math.


Mr. Condescension - perhaps you should do some math yourself.

People who live paycheck-to-paycheck often can't afford a large (for them) upfront purchase, even if it leads to long-term savings. This is especially true if someone needs to purchase several of these expensive bulbs at once. "You'll make up for it in the first year" is cold comfort for someone who must choose between fuel for traveling to work and a couple of lightbulbs today.

But don't bother yourself with that. Just go back to spouting naive, high school civics nonsense.
Bob_Wallace
5 / 5 (3) Dec 18, 2013
There is no need to purchase a bunch of LEDs at once. Buy one a month and start replacing your most used bulbs. Put the removed incandescents aside to replace burned out bulbs in less used places like closets and hallways.

You can't squeeze <$10 out of your budget to save > $150 going forward?

Shovel someone's sidewalk, babysit, there are many ways to earn an extra $10/month. After the first half dozen or so bulbs your electricity savings will start buying you a new LED per month.

In a year you'll have all the important bulbs replaced and will be saving some nice cash.
UberGoober
not rated yet Dec 18, 2013
I just spent $1200 replacing every incandescent and CFL in my home with LED. A little late! But 800 lumens in 10.5 watts seems pretty good- I think my current bulbs are getting that with 13 watts.
MandoZink
5 / 5 (1) Dec 21, 2013
When decent color temperature (2700k-300oK) CFL's came out on the market, I gave a few multi-packs of them away as Xmas presents. I included a spreadsheet printout showing their real value at our local electric rate, which is fairly reasonable at $0.0795/kWh.

One 25w CFL (100w equiv) has an average lifetime of 10,000 hrs, during which it will consume $19.88 worth of electricity. The current cost of a CFL is less than $5.

So, 25w/1000 x 10,000hrs x $0.0795 = $19.88
Adding a $5 bulb = $24.88 TOTAL!

Burning a series of 100w incandescent lamps for 10,000 hrs will cost $79.50.
100w/1000 x 10,000hrs x $0.0795 = $79.50

Even if you got your 100w incandescent bulb for FREE, it will still cost you you over 3 times as much for the energy used compared to a 25w CFL bulb, or $54.62 in this case.

Since a 100w/120v incandescent has an average lifetime of 750 hrs, it takes approximately 13 of them to last as long as one 25w CFL.

Inevitably, my $25 gift was a $250 value to each recipient.
JRi
not rated yet Dec 21, 2013
There is no need to purchase a bunch of LEDs at once. Buy one a month and start replacing your most used bulbs.


I think the best way with CFT is just to replace them as they die out, one by one. The energy efficiency difference between LED and CFT is not significant. It also doesn't make sense to waste a perfectly working device. And lastly, LEDs are still developing fast. Next year's models will be more efficient and will have higher CRI than the LEDs today.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (1) Dec 22, 2013
There is no need to purchase a bunch of LEDs at once. Buy one a month and start replacing your most used bulbs.


I think the best way with CFT is just to replace them as they die out, one by one. The energy efficiency difference between LED and CFT is not significant. It also doesn't make sense to waste a perfectly working device. And lastly, LEDs are still developing fast. Next year's models will be more efficient and will have higher CRI than the LEDs today.

And probably cheaper...
Solon
not rated yet Dec 23, 2013
Bob_Wallace
"Yep, you lost your freedom to waste energy and contribute to global warming."

Well I spent my hard earned money on new, efficient lighting, and now my furnace comes on more often, to make up for the loss of heat from the old bulbs I suppose. So those of us in the cooler climates are actually worse off. Good deal.
Bob_Wallace
not rated yet Dec 23, 2013
and now my furnace comes on more often, to make up for the loss of heat from the old bulbs I suppose.


Well, that's a great thing. (If it's actually true - I doubt there's enough difference for you to detect without equipment.)

That means that you are spending your heating money in a much more efficient manner. Heating with light bulbs is very inefficient.

And think how much less your AC will run in hot weather.
Solon
not rated yet Dec 23, 2013
"And think how much less your AC will run in hot weather."

I don't have A/C, don't need it. I don't think anyone else should have them either, that would save a whole lot of power consumption. And there was a time before A/C, so they are not essential to life.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Dec 23, 2013
"60- and 40-watt incandescent bulbs will be phased out."
We have already "lost" the 100w and 75w bulbs thanks to our Big Brother government mentality. When do we say enough and throw the bums out ?
EVERYONE should read George Orwells book 1984, and wake up to the loss of your freedoms.
But lucky for you you can still get kerosene lamps. This should make you happy.
Bob_Wallace
not rated yet Dec 23, 2013
"And think how much less your AC will run in hot weather."

I don't have A/C, don't need it. I don't think anyone else should have them either, that would save a whole lot of power consumption. And there was a time before A/C, so they are not essential to life.


Best you turn off your heater. Build a fire in your man cave.