EU plans stiff duties on biodiesel

Oct 04, 2013
Tanks of biodiesel (L) and soy oil in Argentina on September 4, 2013

The EU plans to impose stiff taxes on Argentinian and Indonesian biodiesel imports for alleged trade dumping, industry players said on Friday.

According to Argentinian companies the Commission will seek to apply a permanent duty of 22 to 25 percent on Argentinian from the beginning of 2014.

In May, the European Commission imposed temporary duties on biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia, saying they were being dumped below cost on the European market.

The European Biodiesel Board, which represents most European companies active in the sector, said the proposed permanent duties would mean a tax of 215 to 250 euros ($292-340) per tonne on Argentinian biodiesel imports and 120 to 180 euros on Indonesian biodiesel.

The Commission declined to confirm the figures.

It said concerned parties had two more weeks to make comments before the proposals are submitted to EU member states, which should decide by November 28 on the duties.

European companies have welcomed the efforts to protect their sector, but Argentinian producers said in a statement Friday the duties "will be prohibitive ... and close the doors to the European market".

The EU accounts for 90 percent of Argentinian biodiesel exports.

Argentina is the world's top biodiesel producer, making 2.5 million tonnes worth $1.8 billion in 2012. Some 1.6 million tonnes were exported.

Trouble for the Argentinian biodiesel sector began in 2012 when Spain put in place measures to limit imports after the Argentinian government nationalised a stake of YPF oil company owned by Spanish oil giant Repsol.

Explore further: EU farmers want S.Africa fruit imports suspended due to disease

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Team develops device to detect biodiesel contamination

Sep 05, 2013

In 2010, a Cathay Pacific Airways plane was arriving in Hong Kong when the engine control thrusts seized up and it was forced to make a hard landing—injuring dozens. The potential culprit? Contaminated fuel.

Alligator fat could be used to make biodiesel

Aug 18, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In addition to being a novelty food, alligators could also provide a feedstock for biodiesel. Every year, the alligator meat industry disposes of about 15 million pounds of alligator fat in ...

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

10 hours ago

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

10 hours ago

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

Wireless power transfer achieved at five-meter distance

10 hours ago

The way electronic devices receive their power has changed tremendously over the past few decades, from wired to non-wired. Users today enjoy all kinds of wireless electronic gadgets including cell phones, ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...