Capsella provides insight into the genomic results of selfing

Jun 24, 2013
Capsella provides insight into the genomic results of selfing
BOSSA DE PASTOR - Capsella Rubella. Credit: Montse Poch

About 200,000 years ago, Capsella rubella began self fertilizing and split from C. grandiflora. To study the effects of selfing on C. rubella's genome, the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute sequenced and compared it with C. grandiflora and members of the closely related Arabidopsis genus - the first plant ever sequenced and model species for plant genomics. The study was published June 9th in Nature Genetics.

C. showed a mass decline of the removal of harmful mutations without a naturally occurring alteration in the amount of genes present that can move between chromosomes. From these findings, it is theorized that a dramatic event left C. rubella in a situation where a need for pollinators outweighed the known negatives of inbreeding and caused the C. rubella to shift into selfing. Though this caused the C. rubella to face a bottleneck, its ancestral genome structure remained intact.

"The factors driving such contrasting modes of genome expansion and shrinkage are far from resolved, and it will be important to broaden future comparisons to larger phylogenetic scales to better understand the processes driving evolution," the team said on the study's conclusion and future plans.

Explore further: A protein controlling root structure could play a widespread role in plant cellular signaling

More information: www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop… nt/full/ng.2669.html

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Self-fertilizing plants contribute to their own demise

Jun 10, 2013

Many plants are self-fertilizing, meaning they act as both mother and father to their own seeds. This strategy – known as selfing – guarantees reproduction but, over time, leads to reduced diversity and ...

Study finds why some don't respond to rubella vaccine

May 01, 2013

Using advanced genetic sequencing technology and analysis, Mayo Clinic vaccine researchers have identified 27 genes that respond in very different ways to the standard rubella vaccine, making the vaccine less effective for ...

Recommended for you

Evolutionary novelties in vision

Mar 27, 2015

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophis ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.