First close up images of Chalara fraxinea growing on the leaf stem of infected ash

May 14, 2013
First close up images of Chalara fraxinea growing on the leaf stem of infected ash

The images were obtained using cryo scanning electron microscopy, where the sample is plunged into liquid nitrogen to freeze it and imaged using the electron microscope.

The benefit of this method is that the sample is imaged in as close to its natural state as possible, providing the best quality 3D view of an organism.

First close up images of Chalara fraxinea growing on the leaf stem of infected ash

We want to understand how the fungus makes the fruiting bodies (toadstools) that produce the spores called ascospores which cause infection of ash. The fungus growing within the ash leaf stem produces and that the images show different stages of growth of such an organ. We think that this organ may be fertilised to initiate the sexual cycle that produces infective ascospores.

Explore further: Improved X-ray microscopy makes fluctuations visible

Related Stories

Improved X-ray microscopy makes fluctuations visible

February 6, 2013

X-ray microscopy requires radiation of extremely high quality. In order to obtain sharp images instrument and sample must stay absolutely immobile even at the nanometer scale during the recording. Researchers at the Technische ...

Fungus-on-Fungus Fight Could Benefit Chickpeas

December 8, 2009

( -- The fungus Ascochyta rabiei threatens chickpea crops the world over. But now this blight-causing pathogen could meet its match in Aureobasidium pullulans, a rival fungus that Agricultural Research Service ...

The closest look ever at native human tissue

December 5, 2007

Seeing proteins in their natural environment and interactions inside cells has been a long-standing goal. Using an advanced microscopy technique called cryo-electron tomography, researchers from the European Molecular Biology ...

New genetics project could help save the ash tree

December 21, 2012

A Queen Mary scientist will embark on a new project to decode the ash tree's entire genetic sequence in the hope of stopping Britain's trees from being completely devastated by the Chalara ash dieback fungal disease.

Recommended for you

Ten months in the air without landing

October 27, 2016

Common swifts are known for their impressive aerial abilities, capturing food and nest material while in flight. Now, by attaching data loggers to the birds, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.