Amid drought, US opens up land for grazing, haying

Jul 23, 2012
Corn plants struggle to survive in a drought-stricken farm field on July 19 near Oakton, Indiana. The Obama administration opened up protected US land to help farmers and ranchers hit by severe drought, and encouraged crop insurance companies to forgo charging interest for a month.

The Obama administration opened up protected US land to help farmers and ranchers hit by severe drought Monday, and encouraged crop insurance companies to forgo charging interest for a month.

The US said the new measures for major conservation programs were aimed at helping " as the most wide-spread drought in seven decades intensifies in the United States."

"Beginning today, USDA will open opportunities for haying and grazing on lands enrolled in while providing additional financial and technical assistance to help landowners through this drought," Tom Vilsack said in a statement.

"President (Barack) Obama and I are committed to getting help to producers as soon as possible and sustaining the success of America's rural communities through these difficult times," he said.

The measures add flexibility to three voluntary programs designed to protect the environment.

Additional acres in the Conservation Reserve Program will be made available to farmers and ranchers for haying or grazing, as the most widespread drought in seven decades has substantially reduced forage for livestock, the USDA said.

The lands made available are classified as "abnormally dry" and do not include sensitive lands such as wetlands and rare habitats.

Other areas opened up were in programs dealing with water conservation and wetlands reserves.

Under the Federal Crop Insurance Program, the USDA said it "will encourage crop to voluntarily forego charging interest on unpaid crop insurance premiums for an extra 30 days, to November 1, 2012, for spring crops."

In turn for the help to struggling farmers and ranchers, the USDA said, it will not require the crop insurance companies to pay uncollected producer premiums until one month later.

It recently reduced the interest rate for emergency loans to 2.25 percent, from 3.75 percent.

Since the year began, have been declared in 29 of the nation's 50 states, making farmers there eligible for low-interest federal loans, the USDA said.

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User comments : 7

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Howhot
3.7 / 5 (6) Jul 24, 2012
...the most wide-spread drought in seven decades intensifies in the United States


It's all from a very obvious global warming, as predicted by scientists.
verkle
1.6 / 5 (7) Jul 24, 2012
...the most wide-spread drought in seven decades intensifies in the United States


It's all from a very obvious global warming, as predicted by scientists.


Do you mean just like the drought 7 decades was from a very obvious global warming? Even though it wasn't predicted?

Caliban
5 / 5 (2) Jul 24, 2012
...the most wide-spread drought in seven decades intensifies in the United States


It's all from a very obvious global warming, as predicted by scientists.


Do you mean just like the drought 7 decades was from a very obvious global warming? Even though it wasn't predicted?


Good point there, v-

It may very well have been. Think of the dustbowl as a "harbinger".

To my knowledge, there has never even once been a prediction that was retroactive.

Howhot
3 / 5 (2) Jul 25, 2012
Well, actually when I said "as predicted", what I meant was there are certain computer models that show the central USA being baked from global warming. It doesn't mean there will be a drought, but that is kind of assumed with extreme temperatures.

Anyway, I applaud the Government's intervention into the situation that is just continuing on and on and on.

Vendicar_Decarian
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 26, 2012
Didn't Romney predict and then take his retirement retroactively?

"To my knowledge, there has never even once been a prediction that was retroactive." - Caliban

http://www.newyor...ent.html
Vendicar_Decarian
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 26, 2012
The models just don't show drought for the center of the U.S., they project continuous drought I.E. desertification of that area of the country.

The predictions of those models are now being realized, and food prices are increasing as a result.

Good luck with that.
rubberman
4 / 5 (4) Jul 26, 2012
No No, Lindzen said that the models are faulty, therefore the accuracy of this particular prediction can be easily traced to the fact that someone, somewhere in the midwest left an element on High. Plus it's cooler in Washington!

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