Japan inches towards restarting nuclear reactors

May 30, 2012
The inside of the No. 4 reactor building at the stricken Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant, pictured last week. Japan on Wednesday inched closer to re-starting idle nuclear reactors, just weeks after the last one was switched off amid public disquiet following the disaster at Fukushima.

Japan on Wednesday inched closer to re-starting idle nuclear reactors, just weeks after the last one was switched off amid public disquiet following the disaster at Fukushima.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda indicated that he was close to giving the green light to units at Oi in western Japan, with opinion coalescing around the need to bring them back online.

"We are beginning to gain a certain level of understanding from the concerned," he said, a reference to the self-imposed restriction of seeking agreement from communities that host the plants.

"Nuclear reactors continue to be important for the development of Japanese society as a whole.

"What comes first is not the restart of reactors but the safety of them.

"I will make a final decision after having discussions with ministers concerned if Fukui prefecture and Oi town reach a conclusion."

Japan's political classes have been tip-toeing around the unpopular issue of reactor restarts for months, in the face of public distrust of the technology since the meltdowns at .

Increasingly alarmist warnings of summer , with some estimates suggesting certain areas could see fall as much as 20 percent short of demand, have added urgency to the issue.

Until the tsunami-sparked meltdowns at Fukushima in March 2011, Japan had relied on nuclear power for around 30 percent of its electricity needs.

But in the months following the world's worst atomic disaster since Chernobyl, reactors that were shuttered for safety checks or maintenance have not been allowed to restart, chiefly because of public resistance.

The country's entire stable of 50 working units are now offline, and none can begin again until it has passed internationally approved proving its ability to survive a natural disaster.

They must also be given the nod by the host community and get approval from the central government.

The reactors at Oi are so far the only ones that are anywhere near gaining the necessary approval, but the process has become a kind of Mexican stand-off in which neither local politicians nor the central government in Tokyo appears willing to make the first move.

However, on Wednesday night the head of the Union of Kansai Governments, an umbrella organisation which has representation from a range of local authorities in western Japan, indicated some progress had been made.

"We will accept the decision to be made by the government," Toshizo Ido told reporters after a meeting of the union.

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User comments : 30

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Roland
2 / 5 (8) May 30, 2012
The next Japanese nuclear accident will be even worse, and it is inevitable, says a 3 Mile Island investigator:
http://www.cringe...n-worse/
dschlink
4 / 5 (4) May 30, 2012
Once the old folks start dying of heat-exhaustion, people will be screaming, "Why didn't the reactors get started sooner?!"
kaasinees
1.7 / 5 (11) May 30, 2012
Once the old folks start dying of heat-exhaustion, people will be screaming, "Why didn't the reactors get started sooner?!"

And how will will having nuclear reactors prevent heat exhaustion? You really think a blowing fan helps?
Anyways if they wont die from heat exhaustion they will start dying from cancer.
Terriva
1 / 5 (15) May 30, 2012
Japanese are imbeciles anyway, if they stopped the cold fusion research program in 1998. They deserve their destiny, if they cannot force their government for the responsible solution of energetic crisis. http://www.nytime...ion.html Everyone is willing to protest against nuclear plants, but the public feedback and cold fusion support is apparently missing in this point.

Note that the cold fusion at nickel was known already ten years that time

http://www.lenr-c...xces.pdf

The only thing, which the Japanese were supposed to do is to replicate the simple and perfectly documented Italian experiments.
Terriva
1.1 / 5 (11) May 30, 2012
Note that first documented evidence for hydrogen fusion at nickel and thermal energy observation comes from 1959 already [Journal of American Chemical Society, 81,5032 (1959)]. Researchers R.J.Kokes, and P.H. Anderson were studying adsorption of hydrogen on Raney nickel and they observed "strange feature of exothermic reaction" during it. What they observed actually predated the Piantelli & Foccardi work by 30 years, and the Rossi E-cat catalyst by over 50 years.
NotParker
3.9 / 5 (12) May 30, 2012
Once the old folks start dying of heat-exhaustion, people will be screaming, "Why didn't the reactors get started sooner?!"

And how will will having nuclear reactors prevent heat exhaustion?


Air Conditioning.
aroc91
4.7 / 5 (15) May 30, 2012
There isn't some fucking conspiracy against nickel-catalyzed fusion. If it were possible, it would be done. Metal-catalyzed, especially nickel-catalyzed reduction reactions have been performed for decades. You're as bad as the conspirators that thinks the oil companies assassinate people that build high-MPG cars.

If a block of nickel heated to a couple hundred degrees and H2 gas was all that was necessary for sustainable fusion, people would be doing it in their fucking basements all over the world and it wouldn't be limited to some weaselly old Italian man that won't let people so much as look at his precious invention. On top of that, this stuff wouldn't be limited to tinfoil hat sites that frequently are associated with aliens and all other sorts of crazy bullshit.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) May 30, 2012
HEY JIGGA - you didnt answer my question - what do you think about these LENR wannabees?
http://www.brillo...gy.com/#
http://www.youtub...=related

'There is no respect for the field of cold fusion, because...'
Dark_Squirrel
5 / 5 (10) May 30, 2012
Why does every article contain at least 1 person dedicated to proving some useless as it pertains to the article? The article is about nuclear reactors not cold fusion, if you want to talk about silly ideas and contraptions, I recommend instead of quacking how an entire nation is messed up, why not try said experiment yourself. I am sure you have enough people who believe in the same thing that you can save up your collective allowance and acomplish something with your life.

More to the point, whether or not they want to start them up, eventually it will work itself out, either through the reactors supplying the power or other means being either developed or imported.
NotParker
4 / 5 (8) May 30, 2012
Once the old folks start dying of heat-exhaustion, people will be screaming, "Why didn't the reactors get started sooner?!"


"Deaths from heatstroke in Japan quadrupled in the early part of summer as temperatures rose and air conditioners were switched off in line with government appeals to curb electricity usage to avoid power blackouts.

From June 1 to July 10, the latest period available, 26 people died from heatstroke, compared with six in the same period last year, according to the Fire and Disaster Management Agency. The number of people taken by ambulance to hospitals for heatstroke more than tripled to 12,973, with 48 percent in the most-at-risk group aged 65 years or older."

http://www.bloomb...-ac.html
Terriva
1 / 5 (8) May 30, 2012
..there isn't some fucking conspiracy against nickel-catalyzed fusion. If it were possible, it would be done...
There is fucking and documented conspiracy against whole cold fusion research. This example from MIT is just few weeks old.

Another argument is, the cold fusion of hydrogen at nickel was never attempted to replicate during last twenty years with mainstream physics, in peer-reviewed literature the less. The lack of peer-reviewed attempts for replication serves as an reliable indicator of negativistic ignorance.
Terriva
1.6 / 5 (7) May 30, 2012
...what do you think about these LENR wannabees?
http://www.brillo....com/#..
This company combines the success of Petterson's electrolytic cells with F. Znidarsic's theory, in which cold fusion can be promoted with low frequency EM field, during which the longitudinal and transverse waves at the lattice orbitals resonate mutually. This experiment demonstrates audible noise from cold fusion sparks, which were observed with thermocamera too. The cold fusion effects are tangible and very real: both visible, both audible. They often lead to the erosion (pit formation) at the surface of electrodes, because they're formed with tiny explosions. The Brillouin Energy Ltd. is close to commercialization of their technology.
Terriva
1.5 / 5 (8) May 30, 2012
Cold fusion is reproduced worldwide. We have competing companies like Toyota confirming cold fusion tests by Mitsubishi and hundreds if not thousands of peer reviewed and accepted papers on cold fusion. Cold fusion is researched at both MIT, both NASA by now.
simplicio
4 / 5 (8) May 30, 2012
Cold fusion does not work.
poeteye
2.3 / 5 (4) May 31, 2012
40km2
-- James Ph. Kotsybar

Ancient farms poisoned
by unseeen radiation --
sound of falling tears.
Vendicar_Decarian
4.3 / 5 (4) May 31, 2012
Isn't this like Coke confirming cold fusion tests by Pepsi?

"We have competing companies like Toyota confirming cold fusion tests by Mitsubishi".

Can you provide us with any white papers from Toyota or Mitsubishi confirming the claims made by the cartoonish blog your pointed to by your link?
Vendicar_Decarian
3.8 / 5 (6) May 31, 2012


You can hear the noise of cold fusion being generated in this YouTube video.

http://www.youtub...1V5UNy2k

I can't think of any better proof that cold fusion is real.

I'm convinced.

"audible noise from cold fusion sparks" - Terriva
eigenbasis
2.5 / 5 (6) May 31, 2012
Nulear power is the way of the future -> no gaseous vapors altering our atmospheric composition and no alterations of sea solute concentrations. Keep the Earth green!!!

Plus these radioactive isotopes would have decayed anyways in the center of the Earth, there are terawatts of energy flowing out of the earth's core due to radioactive decays. WAKE UP PUBLIC. We can bury the radioactive waste far below the water table so it will negligibly affect anything that could harm our Earth more than coal, natural gas, oil, and derivitave fossil fuel usage
ShotmanMaslo
3.8 / 5 (4) May 31, 2012
Nulear power is the way of the future -> no gaseous vapors altering our atmospheric composition and no alterations of sea solute concentrations. Keep the Earth green!!!

Plus these radioactive isotopes would have decayed anyways in the center of the Earth, there are terawatts of energy flowing out of the earth's core due to radioactive decays. WAKE UP PUBLIC. We can bury the radioactive waste far below the water table so it will negligibly affect anything that could harm our Earth more than coal, natural gas, oil, and derivitave fossil fuel usage


Why bury nuclear "waste", when it can supply the world energy needs for centuries, and at the same time it will be burned into far less dangerous form?
http://www.monbio...f-waste/
barakn
3.4 / 5 (5) May 31, 2012
The only thing, which the Japanese were supposed to do is to replicate the simple and perfectly documented Italian experiments.

If they're so well-documented and the materials involved are so low-cost that one of them is used to construct the second-to-lowest value coinage in the United States, then you should be able to make one yourself. My challenge to you is to not post to Phys.org again until your computer is powered by cold-fusion - and by you I'm referring to all of your sockpuppets, Zephir.
Terriva
1 / 5 (3) May 31, 2012
My challenge to you is to not post to Phys.org again until your computer is powered by cold-fusion.
We wasted twenty years with this censorship of cold fusion proponents already. So I'll continue in my posts, until mainstream physics will attempt to reproduce the Piantelli and Foccardi research in peer-reviewed mainstream press like the PNAS, Science of Nature. I simply want to see the experiments which will disprove these findings and the people responsible for it.
Terriva
1 / 5 (3) May 31, 2012
I'm convinced. "audible noise from cold fusion sparks" - Terriva
Single experiment means nothing - but when combined with another ones, it provides reliable evidence of cold fusion. I explained already, why the proponents of formal physics cannot handle the emergent evidence. 100 experiments with 60% evidence means nothing for these people, they just need one experiment with 99% evidence. This strategy helps them to delay the acceptance of cold fusion, which would make the research of alternative methods of energy production, conversion, transport and storage useless. Too many researchers are involved in this research, so they all tend to ignore the cold fusion competition as a single men. They do care about continuity of their jobs only, not about the benefit of the rest of people. Which is the reason, why the cold fusion is developed with retired physicists and with people working outside of mainstream physics.
Terriva
1 / 5 (4) May 31, 2012
Cold fusion does not work.
The level, in which common layman understand physics and recognize, what is possible in it and what not exactly corresponds the pathetic competence of mainstream physicists. The mainstream physics was never in such bad shape, as today. The contemporary educational system trains mathematicians with superficial schematic thinking instead of people, who do understand their subject. Who actually understands, what the photon, magnetic field, gravity force or Coulomb force is? For most people these concepts are just void formulas, which they combine blindly.

No wonder, these people are really incompetent to judge, what is possible in solid phase physics and what not. And the laymans know physics just from TV animated shows about Big Bang and string theory. They're brainwashed in the same way, like the Christians with Holly Church of medieval era.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (3) May 31, 2012
Cold fusion does not work.
Is working already since 1950s I tell you. Here is documentation of bubble fusion commercial application - since bought by exxon and buried.
http://www.youtub...a_player

-Muon catalyzed LENR is real. Surface plasmon polariton LENR is also real and NASA has patented it.
http://www.wired....-roundup
aroc91
2 / 5 (1) May 31, 2012
Nothing you say can change the facts. Rossi won't allow any level of transparency and runs around behind his smoke and mirror show. The supporting "evidence" you post consist of free energy blogs that also have close ties to alien and ufo conspirators. Nobody is going to send out a death squad if you decide to build a fusion reactor in your basement to prove everybody wrong.
kaasinees
3.7 / 5 (3) May 31, 2012
LENR cures cancer and turns mortal beings into Gods.
Is there anything it can't do?
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) May 31, 2012
"Defkalion Green
While Rossi has declined to give any further public or scientific demonstrations, saying that he wants to leave it to the market, his rival Defkalion Green technologies has seemingly taken a much bolder approach. It has invited independent testers to carry out trials on its Hyperion LENR reactor."

-And if it IS real I am sure it will cause cancer just like everything else.
El_Nose
not rated yet Jun 01, 2012
if anyone bothered to do the math they would have to acknowledge that the amout of nickel need for the type of fusion reaction that the e-cat can produce would require more nickel to be dug up than is currently produced annually to reduce world energy needs. -- this is not a viable option for future energy markets plain and simple -- but on a small scale could help small areas.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 02, 2012
NOSE

Apparently you are a little wrong?

"In other words, the current annual production of nickel is 155 times the amount of nickel we would use annually to replace oil at our current level of use."

"...as a rough estimate, 16,667 years of nickel fuel for E-Cat energy sounds pretty good. Remembering that nickel is a very common element in our solar system means that we would be able to mine all the nickel we need or want for this ultra-clean power."
http://coldfusion...valence/

-It is not nice to make shit up.
extinct
1 / 5 (1) Jun 02, 2012
we sure do learn from our mistakes! not