Slovenian adventurer ends eco-friendly trip around the world

Apr 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic (L)
Matevz Lenarcic (L), a Slovenian pilot, biologist and photographer, holds up a trophy offered to him after he landed from a succesful around the world flight, at the Ljubljana Airport. The Slovenian adventurer flew out of the capital Ljubljana on January 8, 2012, to start his eco-friendly trip around the world in an ultra-light plane boasting super-low fuel mileage.

Slovenian adventurer Matevz Lenarcic successfully concluded a 100-day eco-friendly trip around the world on Thursday in an ultra-light plane boasting super-low fuel mileage.

"I haven't reached a 'goal' because I do not like goals, what matters is the path we cross," Lenarcic said shortly after landing at Ljubljana's airport late on Thursday.

Lenarcic made the trip flying a Pipistrel Virus-SW914 weighing just 290 kilogrammes (640 pounds) some 100,000 kilometres (62,000 miles), circling the world westbound.

During the trip, Lenarcic overflew seven continents, 60 countries, over 100 national parks, the world's highest mountains including Mount Everest, crossed three oceans and the Antarctic, while burning the smallest amount of unleaded fuel per distance flown.

"It would have been nicer if there were no borders, you do not see borders from the air. Borders are in our heads," the 52-year-old biologist and pilot told journalists.

The accomplished aerial photographer also took pictures as well as measured the concentration of black carbon and light absorbing (LACA) in regions where such measurements have not been made before.

Climatologists are studying the role of these particles in .

"There is plenty of space in the world, lots of people live on it, but we are incapable of distributing the wealth we have," Lenarcic said.

The project was backed by Slovenian light manufacturer Pipistrel.

"Considering the length and how demanding the trip was, I can say that there were almost no problems," Lenarcic said referring to the aircraft.

He added, "This is the best aircraft in the world bearing in mind its performance, fuel consumption, and environment friendliness."

In collaboration with Penn State University in the United States, the plane maker was awarded NASA's Green Aviation prize in 2011 after flying a different, 200 miles in less than two hours using the equivalent in electricity of just over a half-gallon of fuel per occupant.

The trip was Lenarcic's second after circling the globe in 2004 using an ultralight aircraft and flying eastbound.

Explore further: Old timey car to replace NYC horse carriages shown

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Flying car should be available next year (w/ Video)

Jun 30, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Federal Aviation Administration in the US has given approval to the Transition, a two-seater flying car developed over the last four years by Massachusetts Company, Terrafugia.

World's first aircraft with serial hybrid electric drive

Jun 24, 2011

Together with partners, Siemens has built the world’s first aircraft with a serial hybrid electric drive system. The two-seater motor glider DA36 E-Star is presented by Siemens, Diamond Aircraft and EADS ...

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

14 hours ago

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

14 hours ago

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

Wireless power transfer achieved at five-meter distance

15 hours ago

The way electronic devices receive their power has changed tremendously over the past few decades, from wired to non-wired. Users today enjoy all kinds of wireless electronic gadgets including cell phones, ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Scottingham
4 / 5 (1) Apr 19, 2012
This is a tough choice for me...one of these planes or a sailboat with my mythical fortune...

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers ...