80% in Japan 'support nuclear phase-out'

Mar 18, 2012
Anti-nuclear protestors outside Tokyo Electric Power Co headquarters on the anniversary of the Fukushima accident. Eighty percent of Japanese want to phase out the country's reliance on nuclear power and eventually eliminate it, a poll says, a year after Japan was hit by a massive nuclear disaster.

Eighty percent of Japanese want to phase out the country's reliance on nuclear power and eventually eliminate it, a poll said Sunday, a year after Japan was hit by a massive nuclear disaster.

The weekend survey conducted among 3,000 voters showed 80 percent support the idea of ending nuclear power while 16 percent are opposed to it, said the survey published by the Tokyo Shimbun.

But 53 percent would allow idled nuclear reactors to be restarted as far as required as a realistic short-term approach, said the survey that was conducted by the Japan Association for Public Opinion Research comprising major Japanese newspapers and broadcasters.

Since last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi the country's commercial nuclear power plants have been undergoing safety inspections with just two out of 54 reactors currently online.

Japanese business circles fear power shortages could slow an already limping economy, but residents near existing plants are against the early resumption of idled reactors, some filing lawsuits seeking injunctions to block the process.

Despite the government's declaration in December that the crippled plant had been brought to a stable state, 92 percent are worried about it, the survey said.

Prime Minister Yoshiniko Noda's government is planning to draft Japan's overall energy policy later this year including the policy on nuclear power plants.

Noda has said Japan should seek to reduce its reliance on nuclear power, seen as a toned-down claim compared with his predecessor Naoto Kan's announcement that Japan must have the eventual goal of becoming nuclear-free.

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Gigel
1 / 5 (1) Mar 19, 2012
Japan is constantly hit by disasters. Should they quit Japan, perhaps?

Come on guys, adapt, you are some of the best at it. Nuclear energy is an advantage and very difficult to replace.
Kinedryl
1 / 5 (1) Mar 19, 2012
The question is, why Japan abandoned its cold fusion research program, after then. Between 1992 and 1997, Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry sponsored a "New Hydrogen Energy (NHE)" program of US$20 million to research cold fusion. Announcing the end of the program in 1997, the director and one-time proponent of cold fusion research Hideo Ikegami stated "We couldn't achieve what was first claimed in terms of cold fusion. (...) We can't find any reason to propose more money for the coming year or for the future." But these guys never tested the hydrogen fusion at nickel, although its evidence is known from the end of 50's, i.e. over fifty years already. Apparently, the research carps will never empty their own pond.

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