Newspapers to disappear by 2040: UN agency chief

Oct 03, 2011
Newspapers will disappear and be replaced by digital versions by 2040, the UN intellectual property agency's chief has said in an interview.

Newspapers will disappear and be replaced by digital versions by 2040, the UN intellectual property agency's chief said in an interview published on Monday.

Francis Gurry, who heads the World Intellectual Property Organisation told the daily La Tribune de Geneve that "in a few years, there will no longer be printed newspapers as we know it today."

"It's an evolution. There's no good or bad about it. There are studies showing that they will disappear by 2040. In the United States, it will end in 2017," he said.

Gurry noted that in the United States there are already more sold than paper copies of newspapers. In cities, there are also fewer bookshops.

A key problem is the revenue system.

"How can find revenues to pay those who write these articles?" asked Gurry, noting that "the copyright system must be safeguarded as a mechanism to pay these writers."

Explore further: Brain signals turn into drone commands in Lisbon presentation

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cybersquatting disputes grow in 2010

Mar 31, 2011

The number of challenges for cybersquatting -- the misleading use of trademarks for Internet domain names -- rose by 28 percent last year, the World Intellectual Property Organisation said Thursday.

Google stops digitizing old newspapers

May 21, 2011

Google on Friday had stopped digitizing old newspapers as publishers sought to make money off story archives instead of having them hosted free online.

Recommended for you

Can we track the world's nuclear weapons?

3 minutes ago

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has unveiled an interactive infographic that tracks the number and history of nuclear weapons in the nine nuclear weapon states: the United States, Russia, the United Kingdom, France, C ...

Emerging world drives cheap smartphone boom

37 minutes ago

Phone and Internet firms are rolling out cheaper handsets and may turn to hot-air balloons to boost network coverage in developing countries, where sales of smartphones are booming.

Clinton used personal email account as Secretary of State

49 minutes ago

Hillary Rodham Clinton used a personal email account during her time as secretary of state, rather than a government-issued email address, potentially hampering efforts to archive official government documents ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.