U.S. names intellectual-property enforcer

January 6, 2006

The United States Thursday named a California prosecutor to be its chief intellectual-property enforcer in Asia.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Sonderby will be dispatched from San Jose to Bangkok, where he will coordinate the enforcement of U.S. intellectual-property rights in key areas of Asia. The job consists largely of assisting Asian governments with intellectual-property investigations.

The veteran prosecutor specialized in intellectual-property prosecutions in Northern California and is currently head of the Justice Department's anti-hacking office in San Jose.

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said in a statement that protection of U.S. intellectual property is a high priority of the Bush administration.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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