World survey suggests major technology changes

Aug 24, 2011

A new global survey by the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA) suggests that a technological overhaul of production processes worldwide is needed to end poverty and avert the likely impacts of climate change and environmental degradation.

Launched at The Australian National University today, the World Economic and Social Survey is an annual flagship report of UN-DESA which this year is called The Great Green Technological Transformation.

ANU PhD scholar and one of the lead authors of the 2009 report, Imran Habib Ahmad, launched the report in Australia. He said this year’s report revealed that major investments would be needed worldwide in areas such as the development and scaling up of clean energy technologies, sustainable farming and forestry technique and climate-proofing of infrastructure.

“This report will be a very helpful contribution to the ongoing national policy discussions on climate change and green economy developments in both developed and developing countries,” he said.

“It details the measures needed to undertake a fundamental technological transformation, not only to promote growth, but also to help reach the goal of full decarbonisation of the global energy system by 2050.

“This survey nicely builds on the 2009 survey Promoting Development, Saving the Planet of which I was one of the lead authors. The 2009 report articulated an integrated approach to dealing with the climate and development challenge, using a comprehensive set of measures with an investment driven approach including a price mechanism.”

The 2011 survey was led by UN Development Policy and Analysis Division Director Rob Vos, under the overall guidance of UN-DESA Under-Secretary General Sha Zukang and Assistant Secretary General for Economic Development Jomo Kwamme Sundaram.

“This report shows how important technological progress will be for ensuring a future that benefits everyone while protecting our planet,” Sha Zukang said. He is also Secretary-General of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development, often referred to as Rio+20, to take place in June 2012 in Brazil.

“The report is required reading as we gear up for  Rio+20, which is an opportunity to define pathways to a safer, cleaner and more prosperous world for all.”

The is available at http://www.un.org/en//desa/policy/wess/index.shtml

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