Research gives insight into using graphene in electronics

September 22, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- New findings from the laboratory of University of Illinois researcher Joe Lyding are providing valuable insight into graphene, a single two-dimensional layer of graphite with numerous electronic and mechanical properties that make it attractive for use in electronics.

Lyding, a researcher at Illinois’s Beckman Institute, and his lab report using a dry deposition method they developed to deposit pieces of on semiconducting substrates and on the electronic character of graphene at room temperature they observed using the method. The paper, by Lyding, lead author Kevin He of the Lyding lab, and their collaborators, is titled Separation-Dependent Electronic Transparency of Monolayer Graphene Membranes on III-V Semiconductor Substrates and appeared last month in the journal Nanoletters.

The researchers wrote this of graphene’s potential, especially as compared to its elemental cousin, carbon nanotubes, for use in electronics and other applications: “It exhibits the , even at room temperature, and its optical transparency is directly related to the fine structure constant. Graphene is more and more being thought of as a fairly strong and elastic membrane (with an associated potential as a material for NEMS applications). Unlike carbon nanotubes, graphene can be patterned using standard e-beam lithographic techniques, making it an attractive prospect for use in semiconductor devices.”

To reach that goal, issues associated with graphene must be overcome, and this paper gives insight into a much-needed step in that direction: understanding substrate-graphene interactions toward integration into future nanoelectronic devices. The project investigated the electronic character of the underlying substrate of graphene at room temperature and reports on “an apparent electronic semitransparency at high bias of the nanometer-sized monolayer graphene pieces observed using an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV-STM) and corroborated via first-principles studies.” This semitransparency was made manifest through observation of the substrate atomic structure through the graphene.

Lyding’s research group had developed a non-chemical (dry) technique for depositing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a surface called Dry Contact Transfer that allowed the CNTs to maintain their electronic properties. They later applied the method to graphene and were able to deposit pristine, nanometer-sized graphene pieces in situ onto atomically flat UHV-cleaved Gallium arsenide and Indium arsenide semiconductor substrates with low amounts of extraneous contamination.

The electronic semitransparency of the graphene pieces was observed when the UHV STM probe pushed the graphene 0.05nm closer to the surface, causing its electronic structure to mix with that of the surface.

In summary, the researchers write, their results “highlight the significance of graphene-substrate interactions and suggest that proper control of the substrate can have a major effect on the electronic properties of the graphene it supports.”

Explore further: Light-speed nanotech: Controlling the nature of graphene

More information: Link to paper: pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl101527e?prevSearch=Joseph%2BLyding&searchHistoryKey=

Related Stories

Light-speed nanotech: Controlling the nature of graphene

January 21, 2009

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered a new method for controlling the nature of graphene, bringing academia and industry potentially one step closer to realizing the mass production of graphene-based ...

Unzipping Carbon Nanotubes Can Make Graphene Ribbons

April 20, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By "unzipping" carbon nanotubes, researchers have shown how to make flat graphene ribbons. Graphene, which is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon that looks like chicken wire, has unique electrical properties ...

A huge step toward mass production of graphene

March 10, 2010

Scientists have leaped over a major hurdle in efforts to begin commercial production of a form of carbon that could rival silicon in its potential for revolutionizing electronics devices ranging from supercomputers to cell ...

Highlight: Nanopatterning of Graphene

March 11, 2010

Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory users from Politecnico di Milano in Italy, working collaboratively with researchers in the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group, have demonstrated ...

A 'huge step' toward mass production of graphene

June 9, 2010

Scientists have leaped over a major hurdle in efforts to begin commercial production of a form of carbon that could rival silicon in its potential for revolutionizing electronics devices ranging from supercomputers to cell ...

Recommended for you

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins

August 25, 2016

Ultrasound imaging is used around the world to help visualize developing babies and diagnose disease. Sound waves bounce off the tissues, revealing their different densities and shapes. The next step in ultrasound technology ...

Nanovesicles in predictable shapes

August 25, 2016

Beads, disks, bowls and rods: scientists at Radboud University have demonstrated the first methodological approach to control the shapes of nanovesicles. This opens doors for the use of nanovesicles in biomedical applications, ...

Graphene under pressure

August 25, 2016

Small balloons made from one-atom-thick material graphene can withstand enormous pressures, much higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean, scientists at the University of Manchester report.

Neuromorphic computing mimics important brain feature

August 18, 2016

(Phys.org)—When you hear a sound, only some of the neurons in the auditory cortex of your brain are activated. This is because every auditory neuron is tuned to a certain range of sound, so that each neuron is more sensitive ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

laserdaveb
3 / 5 (1) Sep 22, 2010
Are they saying it normally floats above the substrate?...hmm..all bonds are satified in the graphene..same with GaAs..so so the shell orbitals create a repulsive gap...a nano hocky puck!
FastEddy
not rated yet Sep 23, 2010
"... The electronic semitransparency of the graphene pieces was observed when the UHV STM probe pushed the graphene 0.05nm closer to the surface, causing its electronic structure to mix with that of the surface. ..."

This "roundup" of Graphene lab reports is important enough to recognize that Graphene apparently can be treated as akin to colloidal suspensions ... almost as if it could be sprayed on like paint. Wondering now about application of Graphene to a surface by electrostatic "painting" ... hardly "nano", more like "micro" or even "macro" in practical application.

BTW: Hats off to the U. of Illinois crew and so many others AND PhysOrg.com for these wonderfully detailed news releases re: NanoTech and Graphene research ... I may start another business :>)

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.