Researchers continue to refine graphene production using HPC

Graphene may be among the most exciting scientific discoveries of the last century. While it is strikingly familiar to us—graphene is considered an allotrope of carbon, meaning that it essentially the same substance as ...

Hexagonal boron nitride's remarkable toughness unmasked

It's official: Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is the iron man of 2D materials, so resistant to cracking that it defies a century-old theoretical description engineers still use to measure toughness.

Graphene-based nanozyme helps to detect L-cysteine in serum

Graphene-based materials can be obtained using various reducing agents, many of which are dangerous and toxic chemicals, and the obtained graphene-based materials are prone to aggregation, limiting their practical applications.

3D shape reconfiguration of stretchable electronics

Azobenzene functionalized liquid crystalline polymers are considered "smart" materials owing to their programmable shape transformations under various external stimuli (i.e., thermal, chemical, and photomechanical shape morphing). ...

Superflimsy graphene turned ultrastiff by optical forging

Graphene is an ultrathin material characterized by its ultrasmall bending modulus, superflimsiness. Now the researchers at the Nanoscience Center of the University of Jyväskylä have demonstrated how an experimental technique ...

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Graphene

Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. It can be viewed as an atomic-scale chicken wire made of carbon atoms and their bonds. The name comes from GRAPHITE + -ENE; graphite itself consists of many graphene sheets stacked together.

The carbon-carbon bond length in graphene is approximately 0.142 nm. Graphene is the basic structural element of some carbon allotropes including graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. It can also be considered as an infinitely large aromatic molecule, the limiting case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons called graphenes.

Measurements have shown that graphene has a breaking strength 200 times greater than steel, making it the strongest material ever tested.

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