Graphene mapping 50 times faster

Graphene has created high expectations, as a strong, ultrathin, two-dimensional material that could also be the basis for new components in information technology. There is hence a huge need for characterization of graphene ...

Stress test reveals graphene won't crack under pressure

Graphene is a paradox. It is the thinnest material known to science, yet also one of the strongest. Now, research from University of Toronto Engineering shows that graphene is also highly resistant to fatigue—able to withstand ...

Handbook of graphene manufacturing published

Encompassing more than 1,500 references and the knowledge of 70 co-authors from EU-funded Graphene Flagship partners and associate members, the article aims to provide a single source of knowledge on graphene and related ...

Lab turns trash into valuable graphene in a flash

That banana peel, turned into graphene, can help facilitate a massive reduction of the environmental impact of concrete and other building materials. While you're at it, toss in those plastic empties.

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Graphene

Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. It can be viewed as an atomic-scale chicken wire made of carbon atoms and their bonds. The name comes from GRAPHITE + -ENE; graphite itself consists of many graphene sheets stacked together.

The carbon-carbon bond length in graphene is approximately 0.142 nm. Graphene is the basic structural element of some carbon allotropes including graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. It can also be considered as an infinitely large aromatic molecule, the limiting case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons called graphenes.

Measurements have shown that graphene has a breaking strength 200 times greater than steel, making it the strongest material ever tested.

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