A superconducting diode without an external magnetic field

Superconductors are the key to lossless current flow. However, the realization of superconducting diodes has only recently become an important topic of fundamental research. An international research team involving the theoretical ...

Graphene as 'the philosopher's stone': Turning waste into gold

Throughout history, alchemists believed in the existence of the philosopher's stone: a substance that could turn cheap substances into precious gold. Now scientists from The University of Manchester, Tsinghua University in ...

Unexpected quantum effects in natural double-layer graphene

An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has detected novel quantum effects in high-precision studies of natural double-layer graphene and has interpreted them together with the University of Texas ...

Nano-sponges with potential for rapid wastewater treatment

Efficient adsorbents for industrial wastewater treatment are important to minimize potential environmental damage. In particular, organic dyes, as a significant group of industrial pollutants, are usually highly water soluble, ...

Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene

Graphene consists of carbon atoms that crosslink in a plane to form a flat honeycomb structure. In addition to surprisingly high mechanical stability, the material has exciting electronic properties. The electrons behave ...

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Graphene

Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. It can be viewed as an atomic-scale chicken wire made of carbon atoms and their bonds. The name comes from GRAPHITE + -ENE; graphite itself consists of many graphene sheets stacked together.

The carbon-carbon bond length in graphene is approximately 0.142 nm. Graphene is the basic structural element of some carbon allotropes including graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. It can also be considered as an infinitely large aromatic molecule, the limiting case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons called graphenes.

Measurements have shown that graphene has a breaking strength 200 times greater than steel, making it the strongest material ever tested.

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