Layer-engineered large-area exfoliation of graphene

Large-scale manufacturing processes that aim to produce two-dimensional materials (2DMs) for industrial applications are based on a competition between quality and productivity. The top-down mechanical cleavage method allows ...

Large-area electronic-grade graphene grows on the cheap

The electronics industry might look very different today were it not for the dramatic drop in cost of high-quality single-crystalline silicon wafers over the past five decades. So what would happen if the cost of single-crystalline ...

page 1 from 40

Graphene

Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. It can be viewed as an atomic-scale chicken wire made of carbon atoms and their bonds. The name comes from GRAPHITE + -ENE; graphite itself consists of many graphene sheets stacked together.

The carbon-carbon bond length in graphene is approximately 0.142 nm. Graphene is the basic structural element of some carbon allotropes including graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. It can also be considered as an infinitely large aromatic molecule, the limiting case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons called graphenes.

Measurements have shown that graphene has a breaking strength 200 times greater than steel, making it the strongest material ever tested.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA