Once a depression, 6E now a remnant, NASA imagery shows little strength left

Jul 16, 2010
This infrared satellite image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a small area of strong convection (purple) remaining in Tropical Depression 6E on July 15, where cloud top temperatures were colder than -63F. Credit: Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

The storm known formerly as Tropical Depression 6E, or TD6E, has been downgraded into a remnant low pressure system in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. On July 16 when NASA's Aqua satellite flew over TD6E, the infrared imagery showed a small area of strong convection in the storm.

The image, captured on July 15 at 2105 UTC 5:05 p.m. EDT was captured when 6E was still a . By July 16, 6E was a remnant low pressure area and had near 25 knots (28 mph). It was located near 18 North and 111 West hundreds of miles from the southwestern coast of Mexico. 6E was moving west-northwestward near 10 knots (11 mph). The estimated minimum central pressure is 1006 millibars.

On July 16, the National Hurricane Center indicated that scattered moderate isolated strong convection is occurring within 300 nautical miles in the western semicircle. On July 15, NASA showed the strongest convection to the south of the center of circulation.

6E is a large remnant low, about 600 nautical miles in diameter, and is being "stretched" and elongated because of strong vertical wind shear. It's the wind shear, coupled with dry air and cooler waters (that 6E is moving into) that make strengthening back into a tropical very unlikely.

Explore further: Tree rings denote century-old weather patterns

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Satellite sees smoky skies over World Cup soccer

4 hours ago

Soccer fever gripped the U.S. at the same time as the smoke from Canadian wildfires gripped the skies over Vancouver, British Columbia. This was the site of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Finals on July ...

NASA sees Nangka become a typhoon

10 hours ago

Tropical Storm Nangka strengthened to a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean just after NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on July 6. Infrared data from the AIRS instrument showed very cold cloud ...

NASA's infrared look at strengthening Typhoon Chan-Hom

11 hours ago

During the early morning hours on July 6, Chan-Hom was a strong tropical storm. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very powerful thunderstorms that hinted at intensification, and later in the ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.