Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry

Hypersaline brines—water that contains high concentrations of dissolved salts and whose saline levels are higher than ocean water—are a growing environmental concern around the world. Very challenging and costly to treat, ...

Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

Arsenic is a deadly poison for most living things, but new research shows that microorganisms are breathing arsenic in a large area of the Pacific Ocean. A University of Washington team has discovered that an ancient survival ...

At the rim: Mods to nanotubes help filter salt from seawater

As the global population continues to climb, the demand for drinkable freshwater is likewise rising. One potential solution to the shortages now threatening one-third of the world's people involves removing salt from seawater ...

Organotin poisoning may cause obesity, medics say

RUDN medics report that exposure to organotin compounds may cause metabolic disturbance and therefore lead to obesity. Being aware of the mechanisms of such exposure, doctors can neutralize the effect of the toxins. The work ...

Image: Semarang, Indonesia

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over Semarang, Indonesia. A port city on the north coast of Java, Semarang is the fifth-largest city in the country, covering some 374 sq km and home to just over 1.5 million ...

Climate change a threat to even the most tolerant oysters

Climate change-associated severe weather events may cause flooding that threatens the survival of the Olympia oyster, new research suggests. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) ...

page 1 from 22

Seawater

Seawater is water from a sea or ocean. On average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5%. This means that every 1 kg of seawater has approximately 35 grams of dissolved salts (mostly, but not entirely, the ions of sodium chloride: Na+, Cl-). The average density of seawater at the surface of the ocean is 1.025 g/ml; seawater is denser than freshwater (which reaches a maximum density of 1.000 g/ml at a temperature of 4°C) because of the added mass of the salts. The freezing point of sea water decreases with increasing salinity and is about -2°C (28.4°F) at 35 gram per liter.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA