Particles at the ocean surface and seafloor aren't so different

Although scientists often assume that random variations in scientific data fit symmetrical, bell-shaped normal distributions, nature isn't always so tidy. In some cases, a skewed distribution, like the log-normal probability ...

Mixing solutions in the world's smallest test tubes

Researchers based at the University of Manchester have demonstrated a new method for imaging live chemical reactions with atomic resolution using nanoscale test tubes created using two-dimensional (2D) materials.

Pollen patties may save bees poisoned by pesticides

Pollen-inspired microparticles that could be used to detoxify bees exposed to organophosphate pesticides are reported in Nature Food. This bee detoxification strategy may have implications for reducing the risk of organophosphate ...

Sea butterflies already struggle in acidifying Southern Ocean

The oceans are becoming more acidic because of the rapid release of carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by anthropogenic (human) activities, such as burning of fossil fuels. So far, the oceans have taken up around 30% of all anthropogenic ...

First DNA extracted from modern, ancient and fossil tropical shells

In Wonderland, Alice drank a potion to shrink herself. In nature, some animal species shrink to escape the attention of human hunters, a process that takes from decades to millennia. To begin to understand the genetics of ...

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Calcium carbonate

Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the chemical formula CaCO3. It is a common substance found in rock in all parts of the world, and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, pearls, and eggshells. Calcium carbonate is the active ingredient in agricultural lime, and is usually the principal cause of hard water. It is commonly used medicinally as a calcium supplement or as an antacid, but high consumption can be hazardous.

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