Related topics: climate change · earth · nasa · carbon dioxide · atmosphere

Good things don't come in threes for Antarctic sea ice

As this month marks the third consecutive summer with extremely low sea-ice cover around Antarctica, new statistical research points to fundamental changes taking place in the polar Southern Ocean.

If Hycean worlds really exist, what are their oceans like?

Astronomers have been on the hunt for a new kind of exoplanet in recent years—one especially suited for habitability. They're called Hycean worlds, and they're characterized by vast liquid water oceans and thick hydrogen-rich ...

Video: The latest science on tipping points in Antarctica

Ice loss from Antarctica has increased over the recent decades. The ice sheet in this remote continent covers about 98% of the Antarctic continent and is the largest single mass of ice on Earth. Even small changes in ocean ...

Satellites increasingly critical for monitoring ocean health

Playing a huge role in moderating the climate, oceans are fundamental to the functioning of our planet. Understanding more about how seawater temperatures are rising and how oceans are absorbing excess atmospheric carbon ...

A plan to protect the biodiversity of US waters

Marine biodiversity is in crisis around the globe. Climate change, overfishing, habitat destruction and other extractive industries are causing species losses at an alarming rate. Scientists, managers, and governments are ...

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Ocean

An ocean (from Greek Ωκεανός, Okeanos (Oceanus)) is a major body of saline water, and a principal component of the hydrosphere. Approximately 71% of the Earth's surface (an area of some 361 million square kilometers) is covered by ocean, a continuous body of water that is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas. More than half of this area is over 3,000 meters (9,800 ft) deep. Average oceanic salinity is around 35 parts per thousand (ppt) (3.5%), and nearly all seawater has a salinity in the range of 30 to 38 ppt.

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