Related topics: climate change · earth · nasa · carbon dioxide · atmosphere

Tiny organisms shed big light on ocean nutrients

As the world warms, sweeping changes in marine nutrients seem like an expected consequence of increased ocean temperatures. However, the reality is more complicated. New research suggests that processes below the ocean surface ...

Scientists get to the bottom of deep Pacific ventilation

Recent findings, with important implications for ocean biogeochemistry and climate science, have been published by Nature Communications in a paper by Associate Professor Mark Holzer from UNSW Science's School of Mathematics ...

The shifting dynamics of temperate marine ecosystems

At Shikine Island, Japan, kelp forests and abalone fisheries were once common, but over the last twenty years they have disappeared. Now, researchers from Japan have discovered that these temperate coastal marine ecosystems ...

Building a detailed seafloor map to reveal the ocean's unknowns

Marine scientists often feel like they're fumbling in the dark. The global ocean covers about 71 percent of our planet and is central to life as it exists on Earth. But only about 20 percent of the seafloor has been directly ...

New study puts disparities of climate change on the map

New research, led by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, illustrates the disparity between the narrow origins and far-reaching impacts of greenhouse emissions responsible for disrupting the global climate system. Published in Science ...

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Ocean

An ocean (from Greek Ωκεανός, Okeanos (Oceanus)) is a major body of saline water, and a principal component of the hydrosphere. Approximately 71% of the Earth's surface (an area of some 361 million square kilometers) is covered by ocean, a continuous body of water that is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas. More than half of this area is over 3,000 meters (9,800 ft) deep. Average oceanic salinity is around 35 parts per thousand (ppt) (3.5%), and nearly all seawater has a salinity in the range of 30 to 38 ppt.

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