The evolution of evolutionary developmental biology

Studying evolution by focusing solely on fossils would leave many questions unanswered, but evolutionary developmental biology (otherwise known as "evo-devo") helps fill in the gaps.

The black box behind embryonic development

DNA regulation is a critical process in a cell that allows it to fulfill its function. This process is key during pregnancy, when embryonic cells must develop into all cell types needed to form an embryo. An international ...

Mouse stem cells for primitive endoderm established

Stem cells that give rise to the mouse yolk sac have been isolated and cultured in the lab for the first time by RIKEN researchers, raising the possibility of artificially creating mouse embryos from stem cells in the future.

Act of sabotage determines mammalian embryonic development

Alternative splicing is a fundamental biological process that allows cells to make many different types of mRNAs and proteins from a limited number of genes. For many animals, including humans, it is a feature that is essential ...

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Embryo

An embryo (irregularly from Greek: ἔμβρυον, plural ἔμβρυα, lit. "that which grows," from en- "in" + bryein "to swell, be full"; the proper Latinate form would be embryum) is a multicellular diploid eukaryote in its earliest stage of development, from the time of first cell division until birth, hatching, or germination. In humans, it is called an embryo until about eight weeks after fertilization (i.e. ten weeks LMP), and from then it is instead called a fetus.

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