Related topics: embryos · genes · stem cells · cells · protein

Designing soft materials that mimic biological functions

Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed a theoretical model to design soft materials that demonstrate autonomous oscillating properties that mimic biological functions. The work could advance the design of responsive ...

Mystery of four-horned goats and sheep finally solved

Some members of the Bovidae family have additional horns. In fact, a few local breeds of sheep, which have been selected by many generations of breeders, are known for their multiple horns. Some goats may spontaneously develop ...

How an embryo tells time

It is estimated that the majority of pregnancies that fail do so within the first seven days after fertilization, before the embryo implants into the uterus. In this time period, a complicated cascade of events occurs with ...

How the insect got its wings: Scientists (at last!) tell the tale

It sounds like a "Just So Story"—"How the Insect Got its Wings"—but it's really a mystery that has puzzled biologists for over a century. Intriguing and competing theories of insect wing evolution have emerged in recent ...

Organoids produce embryonic heart

There was a time when the idea of growing organs in the lab was the stuff of science fiction. Today, stem cell biology and tissue engineering are turning fiction into reality with the advent of organoids: tiny lab-grown tissues ...

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Embryogenesis

Embryogenesis (compound of the Greek: εμβρυο-γένεσις "embryo-genesis") is the process by which the embryo is formed and develops. It starts with the fertilization of the ovum (or egg) which, after fertilization, is referred to as a zygote. The zygote undergoes rapid mitotic divisions with no significant growth (a process known as cleavage) and cellular differentiation, leading to development of an embryo. It occurs in both animal and plant development, this article addresses the common features among different animals.

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