Peru archeologists find mummy up to 1,200 years old

The mummy is unusual because the man is bound, with his hands covering his face
The mummy is unusual because the man is bound, with his hands covering his face.

Archeologists in Peru working on a site in the outskirts of the capital Lima have unearthed a mummy believed to be between 800 and 1,200 years old—and, surprisingly, bound with rope.

The remains are thought to be of a man aged 18-22 at the time of his death, with his hands covering his face.

The was found in a burial chamber that is about three meters (10 feet) long and at a depth of about 1.4 meters at the in Cajamarquilla, about 24 kilometers (15 miles) east of Lima.

Archeologist Pieter Van Dalen, who is in charge of the Cajamarquilla project, called the find "peculiar and unique."

"The mummy would have been buried sometime between 800 and 1200 AD," he said—meaning it would be at least 800 years old.

On one side of the mummy, experts found the skeleton of an Andean guinea pig and what appears to be a dog, according to the researchers at the University of San Marcos.

Traces of corn and other vegetables were found in the .

Cajamarquilla was an urban center that could have been home to 10,000-20,000 people, Van Dalen explained.

The city was built in around 200 BC and was occupied until about 1500.


Explore further

Discovery of ancient Peruvian burial tombs sheds new light on Wari culture

© 2021 AFP

Citation: Peru archeologists find mummy up to 1,200 years old (2021, December 1) retrieved 24 January 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2021-12-peru-archeologists-mummy-years.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
212 shares

Feedback to editors