Assessing the possible safety issues in the second nuclear era

nuclear
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A team of researchers with the Chinese Academy of Sciences has carried out an assessment of possible safety issues tied to the rise of the second nuclear era. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the factors that led to the rise of a second nuclear era and possible safety concerns that need to be addressed.

With the advent of the nuclear science that led to the , there also came the development and construction of plants. This period is described by the researchers as the first nuclear era—and the major players were mostly highly developed countries such as the U.S., Japan, France, Germany and the U.K. They note that initially, hopes were high in such countries that nuclear would solve the looming energy crisis. But then accidents happened: TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima. This led to the deceleration of new installations and plans to get rid of some or all of the plants that were already built—and to focus instead on safer power sources such as solar and hydro. But now, the researchers claim, a new nuclear era has begun—this time, driven by less-developed countries such as India and China, and to some degree, Russia. The researchers suggest this new, unexpected second nuclear era is fraught with great risk. They note that despite efforts by the parties involved in implementing nuclear power plants in the first era, major accidents occurred. They further note that recent history suggests that safely producing nuclear energy has still not been fully realized. In their paper, they outline some of the issues involved with the second nuclear era.

The researchers note that unlike most advanced countries, less-developed countries suffer from poor infrastructure and the means for safely maintaining a complex nuclear plant. They also note that the laws in some of the countries developing nuclear are less stringent, and that there is more corruption. They also note there is often less political stability. And there are differences in social values regarding risk and the need for safety practices. They also note that many such countries do not have well-established communications channels between those operating nuclear facilities and the public at large. The recent nuclear accident in Russia highlights why such communications are needed—to protect those in the path of radiation leaks.


Explore further

How energy choices after Fukushima impacted human health and the environment

More information: Yican Wu et al. Nuclear safety in the unexpected second nuclear era, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1820007116

© 2019 Science X Network

Citation: Assessing the possible safety issues in the second nuclear era (2019, August 20) retrieved 19 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-08-safety-issues-nuclear-era.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
132 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Aug 20, 2019
BAN PLUTONIUM!

Aug 20, 2019
Bah. Bureaucrats, accountants, and politicians cannot run nuclear reactors, and when they try the results are infamous. Countries that build nuclear reactors need to understand this, and need to understand why. Otherwise they'll just have more of the same accidents we've already seen. You need to have people who understand how they work, and the dangers they pose, and bureaucrats, accountants, and politicians don't.

Aug 20, 2019
Neither do the Einsteinian Spin doctors DS

Aug 21, 2019
Has nothing to do with Einstein.

Aug 21, 2019
They've been calling me Einstein for 32 years bud , butchered the paper I wrote and stole my copyright, then proceeded to sell the "Magnetism is perpendicular" crap to this day.

We set the Earths' critical mass equation to 50% because of the spin doctor crap, which is actually 100% because of the mono-dimensional energy transfer of proton radiation that they refuse to teach or even believe!

With the amount of Plutonium on Earth today, one Nuclear explosion anywhere on Earth, will set off every reactor on the planet!.

Aug 21, 2019
If you want to see the paper in question I can post it here for you ?

Aug 21, 2019
With the amount of Plutonium on Earth today, one Nuclear explosion anywhere on Earth, will set off every reactor on the planet!.

There was a nuclear explosion in Russia recently. Few people dead and abnormal radiation on measuring points. Did every reactor on the planet explode? No.

With the amount of Plutonium on Earth today, one Nuclear explosion anywhere on Earth, will set off every reactor on the planet!.

There has been the same amount of Plutonium on Earth for a long time. Actually it has gotten less because of decay.

Aug 22, 2019
The fact that a major science site can claim that hydro is a safer source of power generation without references is an issue in itself. For the record, dam failures often kill thousands of people per year, and the largest hydroelectric dam failure killed 272,000 people in one hit. By comparison, Chernobyl killed up to 100 people immediately and will cause up to 4000 additional deaths long term according to the WHO, almost all of which could have been avoided by instructing locals to temporarily not drink milk and/or to take iodine tablets.

Aug 22, 2019
This period is described by the researchers as the first nuclear era—and the major players were mostly highly developed countries such as the U.S., Japan, France, Germany and the U.K. They note that initially, hopes were high in such countries that nuclear power would solve the looming energy crisis.

It did and most certainly will continue to solve the energy crisis, long after the deceit of renewable energy hits the fan. How manipulative is this piece of trash to conveniently conceal the role cheap, reliable nuclear power played in the development and stability of the above countries. The truth lies in the fact that it's in the "best" interest of those countries to ensure the rest remain poor, undeveloped and unstable.

Aug 28, 2019
@antigoracle.
This period is described by the researchers as the first nuclear era—and the major players were mostly highly developed countries such as the U.S., Japan, France, Germany and the U.K. They note that initially, hopes were high in such countries that nuclear power would solve the looming energy crisis.

It did and most certainly will continue to solve the energy crisis, long after the deceit of renewable energy hits the fan. How manipulative is this piece of trash to conveniently conceal the role cheap, reliable nuclear power played in the development and stability of the above countries. The truth lies in the fact that it's in the "best" interest of those countries to ensure the rest remain poor, undeveloped and unstable.
Sure, let Iran, North Korea and every other tinpot and religious crazy nation/group have unfettered nuclear power proliferation. What could possibly go wrong? lol

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more