The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, usually referred to as PNAS, is the official journal of the United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS). PNAS is an important scientific journal that printed its first issue in 1915 and continues to publish highly cited research reports, commentaries, reviews, perspectives, feature articles, profiles, letters to the editor, and actions of the Academy. Coverage in PNAS broadly spans the biological, physical, and social sciences. Although most of the papers published in the journal are in the biomedical sciences, PNAS recruits papers and publishes special features in the physical and social sciences and in mathematics. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. PNAS was established by NAS in 1914, with its first issue published in 1915. The NAS itself had been founded in 1863 as a private institution, but chartered by the US Congress, with the goal to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art." By 1914, the Academy was well established.

Publisher
United States National Academy of Sciences
Country
United States
History
1914 - present
Website
http://www.pnas.org/
Impact factor
9.681 (2011)

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Changing the genetic 'recipe' for protovertebrates

When baking a cake, even a small change to your recipe can have a major impact on the final product. Recently, researchers in Japan have demonstrated that a small alteration in the gene expression "recipe" of the model organism ...

Researchers develop novel microscopic picoshell particles

Production of high-energy fats by microalgae may provide a sustainable, renewable energy source that can help tackle climate change. However, microalgae engineered to produce lipids rapidly usually grow slowly themselves, ...

Century-old electrochemistry law gets update

The Gouy-Chapman theory describes what happens near an electrode when it is in contact with a salt solution, but this description does not match reality. Researcher Kasinath Ojha, assistant professor Katharina Doblhoff-Dier ...

When people 'click' they respond faster to each other

When two people are on the same page in a conversation, sometimes their minds just "click." A Dartmouth study demonstrates that clicking isn't just a figure of speech but is predicted by "response times" in a conversation ...

Self-organization of complex structures

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers have developed a new strategy for manufacturing nanoscale structures in a time- and resource-efficient manner.

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