One change can make diet more planet friendly

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Food production is an important contributor to climate change, accounting for about a quarter of carbon emissions globally. According to a study that examined the real-world diets of thousands of people in the U.S., we could greatly reduce the carbon footprint of what we eat by changing just one food each day.

"We found that making one substitution of poultry for beef resulted in an average reduction of dietary greenhouse gases by about a half," said lead study author Diego Rose, Ph.D., professor and director of nutrition at Tulane University.

Rose will present the research at Nutrition 2019, the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting, held June 8-11, 2019 in Baltimore.

"To our knowledge, this is the only nationally representative study of the carbon footprint of individually chosen diets in the U.S.," said Rose. "We hope this research will raise awareness about the role of the sector in and the sizable impact of a simple dietary change."

The new study is based on diet information from more than 16,000 participants in the 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A portion of this survey asked participants to recall all the foods they consumed in the previous 24 hours. The researchers used this information to determine which foods had the highest greenhouse gas emissions and to calculate a carbon footprint for each individual diet.

They found that the 10 foods with the highest impacts on the environment were all cuts of beef and that about 20 percent of participants reported consuming one of these high-carbon foods. Using simulation, the researchers calculated a new carbon footprint for each diet by replacing beef with the closest related poultry product. For example, a broiled beef steak was replaced with broiled chicken and ground beef with ground turkey. Each substitution was performed only one time for each person that consumed one of the high-carbon foods.

Animal foods are known to contribute more to greenhouse gas emissions than plant foods. Ruminant animal foods such as and lamb have particularly high carbon footprints because cows and sheep also release methane gas.

"Our simulation showed that you don't have to give up animal products to improve your carbon footprint," said Rose. "Just one food substitution brought close to a 50% reduction, on average, in a person's carbon footprint."

The researchers plan to expand this research, which focused on dietary , to include other environmental impacts such as .

Although not the subject of this study, they point out that food waste and overeating also increase the carbon footprint of our diet. Thus, in addition to eating low- foods, better meal planning and eating of leftovers can also help reduce .


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More information: Diego Rose will present this research on Monday, June 10, from 12:15—12:30 p.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 317 (abstract).
Citation: One change can make diet more planet friendly (2019, June 10) retrieved 18 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-diet-planet-friendly.html
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