Blue light special—researcher finds new chemical clusters emit highly efficient light

October 1, 2018, Florida State University
Blue light special -- researcher finds new chemical clusters emit highly efficient light
Credit: Wiley

A Florida State University research team has discovered that a unique organic-inorganic compound containing zero-dimensional molecular clusters emits a highly efficient blue light.

The new discovery is reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Biwu Ma has been working with an emerging class of functional that are organic-inorganic halide hybrids. A typical metal halide hybrid contains metal and halogen, and another component that can be either organic or inorganic.

Ma describes these metal halide hybrids as materials built from Lego-like pieces because they can be assembled by using the same chemical building blocks—metal halide octahedrons.

"Basically, all these materials have the same building blocks." Ma said. "What we have been working on is to find the chemistry to put these Lego pieces together to form different configurations and then explore their distinct properties—such as luminescence—that accompany these configurations."

Previously, Ma's group has reported metal halide layers, wires and tubes using these blocks.

The newly developed single crystalline assembly of metal halide clusters has a highly efficient blue emission—the essential color for solid state lighting and full color display applications.

It has more than 80 percent efficiency, meaning it could potentially be developed for use in photon-related technologies like lasers or light-emitting diodes. "It has fantastic photophysical properties," Ma said. "This quantum efficiency is actually among the highest values reported to date for single crystalline blue light emitters."

Explore further: Research team finds light is key to promising material

More information: Chenkun Zhou et al, Blue Emitting Single Crystalline Assembly of Metal Halide Clusters, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2018). DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b07731

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