The Journal of the American Chemical Society is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1879 by the American Chemical Society. The journal has absorbed two other publications in its history, the Journal of Analytical and Applied Chemistry (July 1893) and the American Chemical Journal (January 1914). It publishes original research papers in all fields of chemistry. Since 2002, the journal is edited by Peter J. Stang (University of Utah). The Journal of the American Chemical Society is abstracted and indexed in Chemical Abstracts Service, Scopus, EBSCOhost, Thomson-Gale, ProQuest, PubMed, Web of Science, and SwetsWise. According to the Journal Citation Reports, it is the most cited journal in this field and has a 2010 impact factor of 9.023.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
1879–present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journals/jacsat/index.html
Impact factor
9.023 (2010)

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Making hydrogen energy with the common nickel

To resolve the energy crisis and environmental issues, research to move away from fossil fuels and convert to eco-friendly and sustainable hydrogen energy is well underway around the world. Recently, a team of researchers ...

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Chemists have developed a nanomaterial that they can trigger to shape shift—from flat sheets to tubes and back to sheets again—in a controllable fashion. The Journal of the American Chemical Society published a description ...

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Chemists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have synthesized extremely unusual compounds. Their central building block is a silicon atom. Different from usual, however, is the arrangement of the four bonding partners of ...

Shining a light on the weird world of dihydrogen phosphate anions

Scientists at UNSW Sydney, together with collaborators from Western Sydney University and The Netherlands, were surprised to find that dihydrogen phosphate anions—vital inorganic ions for cellular activity—bind with other ...

Light-controlled nanomachine controls catalysis

The vision of the future of miniaturization has produced a series of synthetic molecular motors that are driven by a range of energy sources and can carry out various movements. A research group at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität ...

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